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Editor’s Note: In the concluding part of a series, “Angels, demons
and things that go bump in the Night,” Corbett examines the teenage witches’
phenomenon sweeping the world and also the Two Hs of the demonic New Age
movement.



“When I was a little girl, I wanted to be Samantha on ‘Bewitched.’ It

didn’t hurt me none. I’m still a Baptist.”

With these chilling words, Suzanne Sawyer claimed her daughter,
12-year-old Shanna and two girlfriends were just having “innocent fun”
by
reading witchcraft books, according to Charlotte Observer reporter Gail
Smith.

The books were taken away by North Carolina’s Kannapolis Middle
School
officials on Jan. 14 after other students became concerned, believing
the
three had put “death spells” on them.

One of the books, Earth, Air, Fire & Water: More Techniques of
Natural
Magic, was written by the late Scott Cunningham, who died March 28,
1993.

Although it’s said that one shouldn’t speak ill of the dead,
Cunningham was
one of the most dangerous Americans ever born, for he spurred the
teenage
witches’ phenomenon now sweeping the world.

Born in Royal Oak, Michigan on June 27, 1956, Cunningham also wrote
The
Complete Book of Incense, Oils and Brews; Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of
Crystal, Gem, and Metal Magic; Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical
Herbs; Earth Power; Hawaiian Magic; Living Wicca: A Further Guide for
the Solitary Practitioner; The Magic in Food; Magical Aromatherapy: The
Power of Scent; Magical Herbalism; The Magical Household: Empower your
Home with Love, Health, and Happiness; Spell Craft: Creating Magical
Objects; The Truth About Herb Magic; The Truth about Witchcraft Today;
and Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner.

An admirer once wrote that Cunningham learned about Wicca while still
in
high school and practiced elemental magic for 20 years. He experienced,
researched, then wrote about what he learned in his magical training.

“Once we’ve learned the basics of Wiccan beliefs and practices,
living our
religion is, logically, the next step. How we allow it to affect our
lives
is completely up to us,” explained Cunningham.

So why would the daughter of a Baptist mother read such demonic New
Age
literature and then try to practice it?

The blame lies with the parents and her church, for not condemning
such
practices.

But the major culprit has to be today’s Christian church for it
hasn’t been
confrontational in condemning the New Age movement that has numerous
tentacles including drugs, abortions, homosexuality, pornography,
pre-marital sex and now teenage witchcraft.

Both young men and women have been disillusioned.

They’re not always those with spiked green hair, blackened
fingernails and
AC-DC on their CDs. It also being practiced by kids in Bible colleges
and
from fundamentalist backgrounds.

Just listen to Suzanne Sawyer’s words, as quoted by Reporter Smith:
“Anything considered helping people is good witchcraft.”

Both Shanna Sawyer and Meka Robinson, 12, were ordered into the
principal’s office and told to turn over any books on witchcraft and
casting spells.

From hell the voice of Cunningham can be heard: “It’s the type of
magic
that lives within this book: gentle, loving, healing magic. No curses
lurk
within these pages; no rituals of hatred or jealousy or envy.”

Meka’s mother, Melinda Robinson, bleated: “Kids are going to be
kids.”

Besides Cunningham, others with considerable demonic influence on
teen-agers include: Raymond Buckland, Gerald Gardner, Doreen Valiente,
Laurie Cabot, Starhawk, Gerina Dunwich, Stewart & Janet Farrar, D. J.
Conway and
Zsuzsanna Budapest.

The Charlotte Observer article brought little reaction and one of the

girls, Meka Robinson, pouted that her freedom of speech rights had been
violated.

Another youngster, identified only as Andrew, wrote in an article of
How to
worship the Goddess and God while living under a Christian roof:

“Living under Christians is hard enough, let alone living under
Christians
and practicing witchcraft. For me, it’s always been a challenge, but one

I’m willing to face for my beliefs. I have a little stand beside my bed
with two drawers in it. One is really close to the floor, so I hid my
“folder”, inside that one and piled CD’s and books beside it. If my mom
tried to move it, I’d know, but she generally respects my privacy. My
“folder” is just an old folder I used for English class once which I
keep
spells and rituals, etc. in.

“I tied a rope around that and put a little lock on it, putting the
word
“PRIVATE!!” on the front. If my parents found anything in it, they’d
definitely be invading my space, and in my household, that’s a big
crime.
Next, for spells and stuff, I do them real late at night and with
candles I
swiped from my mom’s candle-drawer downstairs, one at a time. I also got

some candles from friends and when I go to the mall. Going to the mall
and
getting friends whose parents don’t care to get you stuff has helped me
A
LOT! You’ll have to hid these things, maybe not the candles, but some
stuff, which isn’t easy, but I’m sure you’ll find a way if your faith is

strong enough. Another thing I do is make up my own spells and rituals.

“I practice what I believe, so if I think doing different things to
open my
psychic capabilities and talk to the Divine will work, I try it.
Surprisingly, I always see results. If push comes to shove and your
parents
discover your stash, be honest. Make them listen. Be calm and explain
Wicca
to them, and say why you disagree with Christianity. Tell them, you
respect
their beliefs and all you’re asking is for them to do the same.”

A 16-year-old witch, Lisa, claims to have been practicing witchcraft
a
little more than a year and she explained:

“I’ve learned so much about the craft. (I’ve been reading books,
going to
web pages, etc. on a regular basis.) I’ve learned that witchcraft is
about
attuning yourself with nature, the seasons, and the four elements. I’ve
learned to fall in love with the earth and feel everything as a living
creature (even the earth itself). It’s like everything, the plants,
animals, earth has a soul of its own. Because of this, most witches help

nature by not littering, or causing any unnecessary polluting.

“Witchcraft is also about honoring the Goddess and God. If we just
perform
spells and don’t celebrate the earth, elements, Goddess, and God, it’s
basically like we are using them and not giving anything back. The power
to
perform spells is a gift from them; we must give something in return. So

instead of performing a spell … just spend your time celebrating the
craft.

“Our craft is also about open-mindedness. We have incorporated many,
many pagan deities into Wicca (old Scandinavian, Celtic, North American
Indian, Egyptian, etc.). Since we are also shunned upon by Christianity,
it’s our duty not to do the same to others.”

The New Age’s teenage witches’ plaque includes 13 goals: 1. Know
yourself;
2. Know your craft; 3. Learn; 4. Apply knowledge with wisdom; 5. Achieve

balance; 6. Keep your words in order; 7. Keep your thoughts in order; 8.

Celebrate life; 9. Attune with the cycle of the Earth; 10. Breathe and
eat
correctly; 11. Exercise the body; 12. Meditate; 13. Honor the Goddess
and
God.

No where in their demonic liturgy is the name Jesus Christ ever
mentioned.

While we’re bombarded with psychic hotline phone numbers, there are
other
avenues into the occult world from angel worship to the worship of Mary.

Two of the more “innocent” are Hypnosis, Horoscopes = Hell.

Author Dave Hunt in Peace, Prosperity and the Coming Holocaust,
details his
reasons for classifying hypnosis as part of the occult:

“One reason for calling hypnotherapy a religious ritual is the fact
that it
produces mysterious effects that leave my investigator, who approaches
it
as science thoroughly puzzled; (1) under hypnosis administered by
psychiatrists, persons who have never had any contact with a UFO can be
stimulated to “remember” UFO abductions that conform in detail to those
described by supposed genuine abductees; (2) hypnosis also leads to
spontaneous “memories” of past and future lives about one-fifth
involving
existence on other planets; (3) hypnotic trance also duplicates the
experiences common under the stimulation of psychedelic drugs, TM, and
other forms of Yoga and Eastern meditation; (4) hypnosis also creates
spontaneous psychic powers, clairvoyance, out-of-body experiences, and
the
whole range of occult phenomena; and (5) the experience of so-called
clinical death is also produced under hypnosis.”

Then there are newspaper horoscopes that some attach such words as
“entertainment” and “fun.”

It’s an easy road to take, for billions of the world’s population
actually
depend on the readings to plan their day and their futures.

The Bible firmly declares that consulting witches, wizards,
sorcerers,
fortune tellers, mediums, diviners and necromancers should be avoided as

well as palmistry, tea leaf reading, Tarot card reading, crystal
reading,
Ouija boards, astrology, horoscopes or black magic in any form.

“But the cowardly, the unbelieving, the vile, the murderers, the
sexually
immoral, those who practice magic arts, the idolaters and all liars –
their place will be in the fiery lake of burning sulfur. This is the
second
death.” (Rev. 21:8)

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