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Is Bill Clinton, the guy who feels our pain, really the type who
could ruthlessly pursue, hound, even eliminate, his enemies?

Despite overwhelming evidence that Clinton has kept score with his
political adversaries, critics and detractors and despite a long and
growing list of mysterious deaths surrounding him, there remains a
reticence to examine this dark side of the president’s personality.

I suspect many people just don’t believe he actually maintains
enemies lists, that he gets even, holds grudges, yields to his explosive
temper. After all, we watch him conduct foreign policy so indecisively,
we see him dismantle the finest military in the world and we listen to
his soft-spoken rhetoric seducing the American people into giving up
their freedom for security and creature comforts. To some, he doesn’t
seem like he could be capable of cold, calculated violence.

But then there are moments like we are experiencing now where the
U.S. military is pounding Serbia, a nation that has caused no harm to
America, its allies or its strategic interests. Is this the work of a
pacifist?

Likewise, you might want to glance at George Stephanopoulos’ book to
see what this insider has to say about a little-known side of Clinton’s
character.

The author describes a meeting between Clinton and Anthony Lake on
the slaughter of U.S. Marines in Mogadishu. This excerpt, minus some
Nixonian-style expletives, is from page 214:

    “We’re not inflicting pain on these f—–s,” Clinton said,
    softly at first. “When people kill us, they should be killed in greater
    numbers.” Then, with his face reddening, his voice rising, and his fist
    pounding his thigh, he leaned into Tony as if it were his fault: “I
    believe in killing people who try to hurt you, and I can’t believe we’re
    being pushed around by these two-bit pr—s.”

“OK,” you say, “but the context of this rage is a foreign policy
disaster, not domestic politics.”

True, but I’ll bet this tiny little outburst provides keen insight
into the demons with which Clinton has been struggling for a long time.
I’ll bet it reveals a side of the president that most Americans have
never seen. And is it such a stretch to believe a man who talks like
that privately to high-level advisers could actually mean it? Clinton is
a man who has always seemed to hate his domestic political adversaries
more than those who represent a genuine foreign threat.

It’s with this background in mind that I remind you there is one news
organization — and one news organization only — that is challenging
Clinton’s abuses of power with regard to the pursuit and punishment of
political enemies using all the many levers of government. That news
organization is this one — WorldNetDaily and its parent company, the
Western Journalism Center.

This morning, at 9 a.m., as part of that commitment, our attorney,
Larry Klayman of Judicial Watch will argue today in federal court in
Sacramento before U.S. District Judge Garland Burrell Jr. that our $10
million lawsuit against officials in the White House and Internal
Revenue Service over the use of political audits should proceed.

If we are successful at proving to a jury that our civil rights were
violated in an attempt to suppress our investigations, it will be much
more difficult for the remaining skeptics — in the press and the public
– to ignore the Clinton administration’s pattern of abuses and crimes.

So, say a little prayer for us this morning. Send us a little
tax-deductible contribution,
if
you can. Perhaps even lend moral support by attending our hearing.

Every day, people write to me and ask what they can do to help expose
the evil and injustices that are plaguing our nation. Here is something
that you can do — something that can achieve real results.

This is not just a battle we’re fighting for ourselves. This is a
battle we are waging for our country, for freedom, for the basic civil
rights of every American and particularly those of us determined to
remove the shackles of government-corporate media complex from the vital
institution of the press.

Are you with us?


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