• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

A few days ago, eight black helicopters belonging to the elite Delta
Force hit
buildings in Kingsville, Texas with real explosives and live ammunition
in
a training exercise that scared local civilians. Similar events have
occurred
in Miami, Charlotte, Pittsburgh, Washington, New Orleans, Los Angeles
and
other U.S. cities, including a Chicago suburb where they bombed an
abandoned seminary.

So what’s the fuss about a military training exercise? Well, Tomas
Sanchez
in Texas is concerned, and he’s no dummy. Sanchez is emergency
management coordinator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency and
head of the military police unit of the Texas State Guard under the
National Guard. He’s also had 30 years service in Navy intelligence work
with a top secret clearance, and he’s one of the few people who’ve seen
Presidential Decision Directive 25.

Here’s what he said about the Delta Force special operation: “The
scenario
if I were creating this ops plan [is that] martial law has been declared

through presidential powers and war powers act, and some citizens have
refused to give up their weapons. They have taken over two of the
buildings
in Kingsville. The police cannot handle it. So you call these guys in.
They
show up and they zap everybody, take all the weapons, and let the local
Police Department clean it up.” Sanchez and other military experts
believe
PDD 25 is the document being used to authorize such military action with

the U.S., and he said, “It’s a done deal. I think there’s some UN folks
involved in this thing too.”

Before you dismiss this as all part of some conspiracy nonsense, you
should
know that on February 20, 1997, Ronnie Edelman of the U.S. Department of

Justice wrote a letter explaining the Clinton administration’s views on
the
Second Amendment and handguns as follows: “The current state of federal
law does not recognize that the Second Amendment protects the right of
private citizens to possess firearms of any type.” Relevant to the UN,
when Boutros Boutros-Ghali was secretary-general, he supported the
report of the
Commission on Global Governance, which said: “We strongly endorse
community initiatives to … encourage the disarming of civilians.” We
also know that President Clinton has been deferential to the U.N.,
saying on Oct. 19, 1993, that his administration was engaging in a
political process regarding Somalia “to see how we can … do all the
things the United Nations ordered to do.” And U.S. Army Specialist
Michael New was court-martialed several years later for refusing to wear
U.N. insignia on his American military uniform.

Are Americans headed for world government? Over a century ago, Cecil
Rhodes developed a plan that would bring about a world government. On
July 20, 1992, Bill Clinton’s Rhodes scholar roommate, Strobe Talbott,
wrote an
article for Time, in which he declared: “Perhaps national sovereignty
wasn’t such a great idea after all,” and “the case for world government”
is
“clinched.” President Clinton made Talbott number two at the State
Department, and in June 1993, the World Federalist Association gave
Talbott
its Global Governance Award for his article. On June 22 of that year,
President Clinton sent a letter to the WFA noting that Norman Cousins, a

past WFA president, had worked for world peace and “world government,”
and President Clinton concluded his letter by wishing the WFA “future
success.”

All of this in no way means that the president and the U.N. are going
to send
military forces to your home to break down your door and confiscate your

firearms. But the actions and quotations above are troubling and do not
auger well for the future of our freedoms, rights, and national
sovereignty.


Dennis L. Cuddy, Ph.D., is the author of “Secret Records Revealed,”
pertaining to President Clinton and others (Hearthstone Publishing,
800-652-1144).

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.