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LITTLE ROCK — When you read this column, God-willing, I will have testified as an expert witness in an important First Amendment case in … gulp … Arkansas.

By tomorrow (Thursday), God-willing, I will be outahere — on my way home, safe and sound.

I’ve avoided Arkansas like the plague for the last several years. Too much small-time corruption here for me…. Too much fear. … Too many mysterious deaths.

I don’t plan to join the body count. I came to stand up for a good man — Pat Matrisciana, a filmmaker who put it all on the line to expose the many scandals surrounding the Clinton administration like a funeral shroud.

Gennifer Flowers, Bill Clinton’s long-time mistress, told Chris Matthews the other day that she avoided the Clinton killing fields by remaining high-profile — even if she was ridiculed, dismissed, rebuffed and scoffed at by most of the establishment press.

Matthews asked her if she really believed the man she loved for so many years — Bill Clinton — had actually ordered people to be killed. Without batting an eyelash, Flowers answered affirmatively.

I’m following the Gennifer Flowers strategy.

If my plane should blow up or get hijacked by terrorists, if I should suddenly become depressed and shoot myself with someone else’s gun leaving no fingerprints, if I should suffer a heart attack after eating in a Little Rock restaurant — just add my name to the list, folks.

Why me? I guess you could classify me as a double threat. First, as the personification of the Clinton’s media enemies list, my story offering documented proof that the White House used the Internal Revenue Service to attack the president’s political adversaries still smolders — threatening, at a moment’s notice, to set the national newscape ablaze. Secondly, I guess you could call me a key witness in a politically inspired defamation case brought by two Arkansas cops involved with drug kingpin/Clinton pal Dan Lasater and the notorious “boys on the tracks” case — a trial that has already seen two more strange deaths.

Anyway, here’s what I came to Little Rock to tell the jury:

  • Pat Matrisciana not only had a constitutional right to make and distribute his film, “Obstruction of Justice: The Mena Connection,” he had a duty as an American filmmaker-journalist.

  • The day the courts start punishing courageous, muckraking journalists who pursue and expose official corruption with multimillion-dollar judgments is the day this nation becomes a full-blown police state (like Arkansas?).

  • By every standard of professional documentary journalism, Matrisciana performed admirably in his pursuit of truth.

Many people close to me did not want me to come to Arkansas. My longevity as a long-term Clinton critic, they suggest, is partially explained by my deliberate avoidance of such venues. But, like my battle with the politically directed IRS, I believe the best defense is a high-profile offense — just like Gennifer Flowers said.

As I winged my way to Little Rock, I heard a report that a new book by Chris Anderson documents that Hillary Clinton did, indeed, as has been reported elsewhere, have a long-term affair with the late White House deputy counsel Vincent Foster.

Foster’s death is just one of many associated with this administration that has never been explained — no matter what Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr would have you believe. This is a death I know something about. It’s one of the investigations that landed me on the Clinton enemies list. The Clinton administration did a remarkable job keeping the information about Foster and Hillary quiet all these years. It was never even discussed as a possible motivation for Foster’s untimely, violent and mysterious death in any of the official reports.

That’s an example of why it is so vital to protect the free flow of information — apart from information disseminated by official government sources.

And that’s precisely why I’m here in … gulp … Little Rock. And why I hope to be outahere real soon. Keep me in your prayers, folks. And add one for Pat Matrisciana, the boys on the tracks and their courageous mother, Linda Ives, who also believes the only way to fight successfully is right out in the open.

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