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According to Yosef Bodansky, a researcher attached to the House
counter-terrorism task force, a Middle East terrorist is now believed to
have as many as 20 suitcase nuclear bombs. In addition, this same
terrorist is alleged to possess biological and chemical weapons of mass
destruction.

Supposedly, Chechen rebels managed to steal nuclear suitcase bombs
from the Russian military. These bombs were then smuggled out of Russia
and sold to Osama bin Laden, an international fugitive and terrorist
hiding in Afghanistan. Readers may recall that Osama bin Laden is a
Saudi national accused of masterminding the Aug. 7, 1998, bombings of
the U.S. embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam. These bombings killed
224 people and left over 5,000 injured.

Blaming Osama bin Laden for the African bombings, President Clinton
launched an air strike against bin Laden’s Afghan base camp. This air
strike, as Clinton’s luck would have it, came shortly after he publicly
apologized for the Monica Lewinsky affair. Clinton also ordered an air
strike against a pharmaceutical plant in Sudan, claiming it was a
chemical weapons factory.

More recently, Clinton Administration officials have accused Osama
bin Laden of plotting bomb attacks against the United States Embassy and
two consulates in India. The U.S. government has offered five million
dollars to anyone who provides information leading to bin Laden’s arrest
or conviction.

In Afghanistan bin Laden is considered a war hero for risking his
life in the struggle against Moscow’s client armies. Therefore, it is
not surprising that many Afghans were dismayed at the idea that bin
Laden was a threat to America. The pro-Taliban Shariat newspaper noted,
“America is a superpower with a strong economy and a strong political
system, so why does it have such an obsession for a person who is very
weak?”

The Taliban judiciary began its own formal investigation into U.S.
claims that bin Laden was waging a war of terror against the United
States. The three-week inquiry was headed by Afghanistan’s chief
justice, Noor Muhammed Saqib. Chief Justice Saqib asked the U.S.
government to provide evidence so that he could act, but the United
States offered no evidence at all. “It is their shame that they have
been silent,” said an angry Saqib. “Anything that happens now anywhere
in the world they blame Osama, but the reality is in the proof — they
have not given us any.”

At his Friday press conference, Bodanksy cited Russian and Saudi
intelligence sources to support his stunning allegations. He also said
that Osama bin Laden was attempting to recruit “former Soviet special
forces” to operate the bombs behind enemy lines.

Bodansky’s sources, however, are suspect. One must always treat the
claims of Russian officials with near-total skepticism. Can we really
believe that the anti-Soviet bin Laden would work closely with former
Soviet commandos who were his deadly enemies in the past? And what sort
of Russian special forces soldier would assist an anti-Russian
terrorist? It is doubtful that any such person has ever existed in the
ranks of Soviet or Russian special forces. In the last analysis, it is
more likely that
Bodansky has been fed false information.

The same goes for the Saudis, who have probably been duped by Russian
intelligence agents. The idea that a minor terrorist, confined to the
wilds of Afghanistan, has obtained a nuclear arsenal that would be the
envy of Libya or Iraq — with their billions — is absurd on its face.
Besides this, the sophistication required to effectively handle weapons
of mass destruction belongs only to governments that have billions of
dollars and armies of dedicated technical specialists. The notion that a
Saudi millionaire-terrorist — not even a billionaire — isolated by his
enmity for American and Russia, could achieve so much with so little, is
more than suspicious. It is ridiculous. That being said, Osama bin Laden
is a convenient diversion for Bill Clinton and for Clinton’s “friends”
in the
Kremlin.

The most alarming thing about the bin Laden story is the way it helps
the nuclear war strategy of the Kremlin. According to the highest
ranking defector from the Russian General Staff, Colonel Stanislav
Lunev, a surprise Russian nuclear strike would begin with the deployment
of 7,000 Spetsnaz commandos to the United States. These would enter the
U.S. as civilians. At the same time, nuclear suitcase bombs together
with biological and chemical weapons would be smuggled into the U.S.
along the same routes used to smuggle narcotics.

The purpose of initiating a general nuclear war with suitcase nuclear
bombs involves the need for “diversion” and “disruption” of U.S. command
and control. According to former CIA analyst Peter Vincent Pry,
“Strategic surprise would be achieved if the … [Russians] could
deprive the United States of strategic warning of their intention to
attack.”

The purpose of detonating nuclear suitcase bombs, and of unleashing
biological and chemical weapons within the U.S., would be to simulate a
terrorist campaign by non-Russian forces. The United States, assuming it
was under attack from ordinary terrorists, would not suspect the true
purpose. Russian Spetsnaz would target U.S. command and control and
early warning systems, as well as other targets that would create
maximum confusion.

The United States early warning network consists of three DSP launch
detection satellites and six radars. The satellites are presently in
geosynchronous orbit over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans.
These satellites are able to detect Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles
(ICBMs) and Submarine Launch Ballistic Missiles (SLBMs) once their
engines are ignited during a launch sequence. Each of the three DSP
satellites has a ground station with uplinks. If these ground stations
are destroyed by suitcase nukes, and if the early warning radars are
damaged, the United States would be blinded.

If U.S. political and military leaders were killed or assassinated by
Spetsnaz commandos, the result might be that nobody in authority would
realize the strategic implications of the attacks on early warning
systems. All that the Russian generals need to achieve surprise is 35
minutes of paralysis, blindness, and confusion. That is what the 7,000
Spetsnaz commandos would be aiming at.

Now that we’ve been told that any Spetsnaz commandos caught on
American soil are probably working for bin Laden, we will be looking the
wrong way.

Last May United States military intelligence detained a group of
Russian tourists who were visiting all the dams along the Colorado
River. It turns out that these “tourists” were suspected to be Russian
Spetsnaz. They were visiting the sites they would attack in the event of
war.

The Russian General Staff regards a future war with America as
“inevitable.” These are not my words, but the words of a colonel who
served the Russian General Staff for nearly 35 years. In this context
the news about bin Laden is more ominous than a small terrorist group
with nuclear
weapons. There has been a larger group of criminals and terrorists
living in the Kremlin since 1917. And they have a lot more than 20
suitcase nuclear bombs.

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