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Biggest spikes of 1999

While most news organizations end each year with retrospective
replays of what they consider to be the year’s top news stories, the
editors of WorldNetDaily have for years found it more newsworthy to
publish a yearend compilation of the 10 most important unreported
or underreported news events of the year. Hence, “Operation
Spike.”

In the past, WND has made the selection itself. But this year,
WorldNetDaily asked its readers to submit what they considered the most
“spiked” stories of 1999 in the Operation Spike forum. Readers
responded with tremendous enthusiasm, submitting so many spiked stories
that WND editors were left wondering just what the establishment media
did cover.

Clinton scandals ranked among the most spiked stories in general. In
fact, more than half of the stories submitted dealt specifically with
President Clinton and his various scandals, many of which the press
seemed conspicuously to avoid. From campaign finance fouls to his
impeachment, President Clinton made all the news — but somehow managed
to stay out of the news.

A spiked story that received one of the largest number of votes was
the allegation by Juanita Broaddrick
that she was raped by then-Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton. Although the
interview with Broaddrick was broadcast on network TV during prime time,
the press ignored it completely, even though a Zogby public opinion poll
showed that most Americans either believe Clinton is guilty of the 1978
rape of Broaddrick, or say that more information is needed to make a
true judgment.

As one reader put it: “The president is credibly accused on national
television of rape, and no one bats an eye.”

Here are the rest of WND’s top 10 spiked stories for 1999:

President Clinton may have had his share of winks and nods with
the press, keeping his actions off the front page, but he isn’t the only
one ignored by most of the news media.

“The establishment press has not served Americans well this
year,” said WorldNetDaily founder and Editor Joseph Farah, “or any
recent year for that matter. The traditional role of a free press is to
be a watchdog on government. But most of the big media seem more intent
on covering up for the government than on covering their corruption,” he
said.

“WorldNetDaily still believes in approaching news reporting the old
fashioned way — by actually digging out and bringing forth the truth,”
said Farah. “In the coming year, readers once again can count on
WorldNetDaily to investigate and present the truly important stories
that are unreported, spun and spiked by the establishment press.”