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For starters, think dehydrated food. It takes up less space than hydrated food, allowing two to three times the storage capacity. Remember the “three don’ts” of long-term food storage:

  • Don’t store your food where the temperature fluctuates dramatically.
  • Don’t store your food where temperatures are extreme.
  • Don’t store your food where there is too much humidity.

The best option is a basement. If this won’t work, you can try to store it wherever you can find a little extra space – closets, under beds, and on the tops of book shelves, refrigerators and other flat surfaces. Your garage may be an option, depending on your climate, but you have to be careful about extreme temperatures and vulnerability to theft. An attic is probably not a good option, too much temperature fluctuation. A climate-controlled, off-site storage unit might be a short-term option, however, some proprietors prohibit food storage of any kind in these units. Regardless, you will want to move the food to your home prior to Y2K – just around the corner – in the event that you can’t get to it because of transportation-related disruptions.

Some people ask, once they’ve got their supply in place, can the government seize it? Executive Order 10998 signed by John F. Kennedy in 1962 gives the Secretary of Agriculture the right to control food and food production in case of attack or other national emergency. Whether or not this could be applied to Y2K-related disruptions is anyone’s guess. The bottom line is that by declaring a national State of Emergency, Congress can, in effect, suspend the Constitution and do whatever it thinks is in the best interests of the country. If that includes confiscating your stockpile of food, so be it. This shouldn’t keep you from preparing, but it should keep you from trusting in your preparations. Ultimately, the only thing that can protect you from a tyrannical government is God Himself.

Personally, I don’t spend a lot of time worrying about Executive Orders. They are simply outside of my sphere of control (or influence, for that matter). I try to stay focused on what I can control and take responsibility for. The rest of it is God’s business.

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