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I have spent a lot of time around illness during the last year. Last
night, it struck me at 3:00 a.m. (this is the time of day when I get my
“revelations”) that a sick body is the perfect metaphor for our world
today.

None of us can deny that the world we live in is diseased, polluted.
Unless we choose to put our heads in the sand, we must face this fact.
However, most of us never deal with illness — either in ourselves or in
the world — until it touches us personally; then, suddenly we become
very concerned with healing.

Most of the time, when we are ill, if we are lucky, our bodies repair
themselves. However, in the elderly, oftentimes the immune system is no
longer strong enough to fight off the disease, and, organ by organ, the
body simply, gradually shuts down. The person dies.

I believe that our world today is dying. I think that it is so
polluted, so diseased, that it is inevitable that the world will
eventually expire. Because I don’t believe in prophecies or any of that
nonsense, I refuse to make any predictions as to when this will happen.
But I don’t think it is that far off. Call me a “doomsayer” if you will,
but this is what I see. Let me amend that: Our world will die, unless we
take action — immediately.

If you agree, the question immediately becomes, “What do we do?” We
can get involved in causes — environmental, political or some other
thing. Or we can go to the core of things and realize that the world is
sick because each of us is sick. J. Krishnamurti has a book entitled,
“We are the World,” and, though I do not particularly care for this
man’s teaching, this statement is absolutely true: The world is not
separate from you and I. So, if we are to cure this diseased, dying
world, we must begin with ourselves and see that each of us is sick.

Someone else (I don’t know who) said, “Physician, heal thyself.” But
the truth is you can’t heal yourself. Nor, obviously, can doctors heal
you. The only one who can heal is God. If you don’t believe in God, then
you can call it “nature,” I don’t care. But most of us don’t even want
to admit we are sick. And worse, we don’t want to admit that we have
absolutely no idea what to do about it.

I am not talking about healing the body, because obviously each one
of our bodies will eventually die. That is why I find it so ugly, so
absurd, that we have become a nation that is so obsessed with health and
fitness (most of which is due to thinly disguised vanity and
narcissism). Not that being fit is bad, but it has nothing whatsoever to
do with the real problem. It is our souls, our hearts that are sick,
diseased, full of poison. They are poisoned every single day by
everything around us — by the newspapers, the TV, the movies, the
politicians, and mostly by the acts we commit.

In order to heal ourselves, we must refrain from indulging in the
things that make us sick. Most of us don’t want to do that because we
are all addicted to something or other, whether it be entertainment, or
food or drugs (legal or illegal). Worst of all, we are addicted to our
ideas, our opinions. We are unwilling to give up our beliefs, because
without them, we are nothing; we have no identity. But I say that unless
we are willing to give up all our addictions, including our
ideas, we are doomed. And our world will die.

Now you may say, well what has all this to do with evil or with
“spiritual warfare?” But you see, this is precisely what spiritual
warfare is all about. Cleansing our souls. Spiritual warfare cannot be
waged in this or that particular area of our lives. It must encompass
each and every area — from the deep to the shallow. Evil works on us at
many levels. And evil may not always be so obvious as two
demon-possessed punks walking through hallways of a high school and
shooting down their classmates. Sometimes, evil is much less obvious.
Sometimes, it may seem almost mundane.

You know, you may want to take your family to the latest movie (and I
don’t just mean the latest slasher flick), and you may think, well
what’s the harm? But I truly believe that we must all hone our level of
awareness. We must become so spiritually keen, so sharp — and in that
light we must consider every single action we take. In order to become
spiritually sharp — so that our senses are alerted at the slightest
smell of evil — we must spend time alone with God, because only in
quiet can we begin to learn and practice discernment.

We have all been dulled, deadened by the things of the world. That is
a trick of evil — to distract us. But we can no longer afford to be
distracted. It is not easy in this noisy world so full of distractions
to find a quiet place where we can be alone with our hearts. It is not
easy, because when you finally find that quiet place, you will see that
your mind never stops chattering. I don’t care whether the chattering
consists of the lyrics of some stupid pop song, or whether you are
reciting biblical phrases; if you are not quiet, you will never be able
to “see.” Just repeating this or that does not help you to discern. I
know that saying this will anger some of you who like to think that by
going around reciting the Bible, you are going to become better human beings.
Sorry, I believe that is false. I don’t care whether you repeat the
Bible or the B’hagvad Gita — the repetition of anything has no effect
but to deaden the mind.

All I’m saying is that if you are serious about engaging in spiritual
warfare, if you are concerned with our diseased, dying world, you must
first of all be able to truly look. And in order to look you must
be quiet. Only out of quiet can you begin to see. And when you see that
you are ill — not as an idea, but actually to see it, to taste it –
only then is there a possibility of getting well.

So let us leave off here, and we will pick up this issue next week.

I want to take just a moment to thank all of you for the
unprecedented response to my first
column.
I am truly humbled by your many heartfelt letters. Now I know that I
made the right choice in deciding to take off the costume, to kill that
tired, old persona. Please know that I truly welcome all your letters,
positive and negative. I will do my best to answer each one of you (no
more auto responders), but please bear with me, as this is very
time-consuming. I hope that if this subject matter interests you, you’ll
pay a visit to our new website. It’s a
“bare bones” site at present, but over the coming weeks, we’ll be adding
many new features, new columns, new resources to help you fight this
battle we are all in. By visiting the site, you can also find out where
I’ll be appearing as well as the release dates of my two new books
(“Demon Hunter: A Personal Odyssey” and “Demon Hunting: A Practical
Manual”). Lastly, if you are wrestling with a particular spiritual issue
that needs immediate attention, or have a friend or relative in a cult
and need advice or help, please write to me at:
help@demonhunter.com.

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