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Not long ago I met a 70-year-old man who lived on a boat at the local
marina. He had sailed the world’s oceans for many years, and he hated
America. He hated the music, the money, the television, the government;
but most of all, he hated the people. In his opinion Americans were
selfish and ignorant. After all, they enjoyed a social system called
capitalism. America was therefore composed of a nation of thieves, polluters
and economic imperialists.

The reason he lived on a boat, it seemed, was to avoid setting foot
on American soil. “They really hate Americans overseas,” he said with
pleasure. Having spent much of his life visiting other countries, he
didn’t see himself as an American at all. He was a citizen of the
world.

But is there really such a thing?

In point of fact, a citizen of the world is a citizen of nowhere. If
you want to travel to different countries you need a passport — a legal
document that says who you are. And believe it or not, every human
being is either a citizen of a state or he is no citizen at all.

But more basic than citizenship is nationality. Every man and woman
has a native tongue, a cultural heritage and ancestors. Every person
has roots. And, believe it or not, these roots provide a kind of
nourishment, which facilitates a certain social dynamic. Of course,
nowadays such nourishment is taken for granted. And this is a big
problem today, because unless Americans begin to acknowledge their
heritage our nation may not survive.

Believe it or not, America has enemies. There are people out there
who hate the United States. They want it to collapse. Even as I write
these words, America is in danger of being dissolved by multiculturalism
and political correctness by America-hating professors and socialist
politicians. In many of our leading institutions the nation’s defenders
are shouted down, time and again, by its detractors. Sometimes those
who take a patriotic stand, who tell the truth about what they see
around them, are forced out of their jobs. Such people include
teachers, soldiers, doctors, law enforcement officials and journalists.
Meanwhile, the vast majority of Americans live in an apathetic haze.

We are losing our country.

America’s heritage is something special. The language we speak, the
Constitution on which our government is based, and the prosperity we
enjoy — all derive from one of history’s lucky hits. America is a kind
of fluke. Its history reads differently than the history of most other
countries. It does not bear the scars that other countries do. We
developed as a nation, isolated by the ocean from European wars and
tyrannies. Pioneers and colonists arrived here to carve a society out
of the wilderness, to found a
government on individual rights by a system of checks and balances.

Those who want to curse this heritage — who see in this nothing but
a crime against nature or the Indians — have yet to say which country
of the old world was better. Those who hate the system of individual
rights, which is called “capitalism” by its enemies, have yet to produce
a superior social system of their own. Those who complain that our
courts are corrupt and our politicians are crooks can only offer in
exchange a totalitarian alternative where the courts are kangaroo and
the politicians are mass murderers.

America is not perfect. And you are free to hate America for its
imperfections. But if imperfection justifies hatred — then hate your
family, hate your friends and hate yourself.

Speaking of hate, we live in a country where hate is prohibited,
unless that hate is directed against the very roots of our existence.
To hate and blame one’s parents has become fashionable. And as a
country is a kind of parent (as in the term “fatherland” or
“motherland”) it has also become fashionable to hate America as well.

Consider the writings, for example, of Noam Chomsky. He is required
reading on most American college campuses. I had to read him in
graduate school. But nobody at school was honest or brave enough to
state, up front, that Chomsky is a liar and an apologist for
totalitarianism. This fact is rarely brought forward.

Read Noam Chomsky and you will discover that he prefers the socialist
bloc to America. He prefers Marxist-Leninists to Republicans. He calls
freedom tyranny and the defense of freedom he calls “terrorism.” His
writings excuse the world’s real terrorists — from the PLO and the
Sandinistas, to the ANC and the Kremlin.

Consider the impudence and ingratitude of an American who hates
America. Think of the ingratitude of living in a free and prosperous
republic, enjoying the advantage of free speech, and using that
advantage to malign the very source of that freedom — and to hail your
nation’s enemies as liberators.

Anti-American propaganda is growth industry in this country. The
themes have been carefully cut and pasted. Our enemies call us to
account for a host of crimes. And look at us now. We have twisted
ourselves into a huge pretzel. We are entangled in political
correctness, sensitivity training, and guilt.

We are guilty of being a successful country, of operating on
principles that work. We are guilty of opposing dictators and mass
murderers. We are guilty of opposing backwardness and injustice.
Consider a list of our chief enemies — the people we have fought –
over the last 60 years. This list includes such wonderful people as
Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Uncle Ho and Saddam.

In the grand scheme of things how evil could America be?

Yes, American soldiers have committed atrocities — as soldiers do in
every war. American politicians have not always been honest, and their
current globalist policies are wrong. But sin is inevitable.
Imperfection comes with the territory. To deconstruct America, to
disallow its role as a defender of freedom, would only leave the world
to the tyrants and the people’s republics. And once these malefactors
have conquered the Eurasian landmass, their final snack will be the
United States itself.

Americans who hate America are real. They are all around us. Go
into a bookstore. Look at the social studies section. Browse for a
while. Ask yourself what purpose this hatred serves and what it
promises to our country and the world.

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