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WASHINGTON — Don’t you dare believe it. Hillary never called a
campaign staffer a “Jew bastard.” She doesn’t even recall the meeting.
Bill says it’s “crap” shoveled out by a couple of losers.

And, c’mon, the charge is made in a book by a tabloid
reporter.

Deny the story, smear the accuser and, if you can, discredit the
source. We’ve seen this pattern before, haven’t we?

When the Clintons and their elitist media pals say a story can’t
possibly have any legs because it came from the National Enquirer,
chances are it’s more truth than trash.

The tabloids don’t usually pay much mind to politics, but then
they’ve never had a tabloid presidency to cover. When they have turned
their sights on Washington, they’ve scored some big hits.

Eight years ago, the Enquirer’s sister rag, The Star, broke the story
on Gennifer Flowers’ affair with Bill Clinton, throwing a big scare into
his campaign just before the New Hampshire primary.

The Clintons’ national political ambitions survived because they went
on “60 Minutes” and lied (Clinton recently admitted to the affair in a
related court
case). And also because the prestige press turned their noses up at the
“tabloid” story, even though Flowers had phone tapes to prove it.

Then during the 1996 campaign, The Star scooped the establishment
press again with the story that Clinton’s top political aide, also
married, was paying Washington hooker Sherry Rowlands for sex. The story
forced Dick Morris to quit in the thick of the race.

But before he did, Morris tried to issue a non-denial denial by
impugning The Star’s reputation. He said he would not subject his wife
and family to the “sadistic vitriol of yellow journalism.” (No, but he
had no problem subjecting them to adultery, illegal vice and world
humiliation. Morris has since shamed himself by appearing on just about
every TV talking-head show on the airwaves.)

The Big Three TV networks, CNN, the New York Times and the Washington
Post eventually picked up the “supermarket tabloid” story, while making
it clear they’d wash their hands thoroughly afterward. Yucky, yucky!

Yeah, well, when your president and first lady dwell in the gutter,
sometimes it takes a sanitation crew to sweep up the truth.

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