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Not so long ago I interviewed a man employed by one of our
intelligence agencies. Let us say the man’s name is John. His
testimony reflects the feelings of many people who defend this country.

The bottom line with John is this: He does not trust Clinton or
Gore. In fact, within John’s agency there have long been rumors about
Clinton’s political machine back in Arkansas. There are stories about
drug running and money laundering. There are also suspicions, among
many, that Clinton and possibly Gore are aligned with longstanding
ideological enemies of the United States.

I asked John specifically about Clinton’s governorship in Arkansas.
He answered by relating a conversation he had with a private pilot
working in South America, who was flying to and from Arkansas in the
1980s. “He was told to keep his mouth shut,” John explained. “Enough
people have had untimely accidents.”

Most of us have heard or read stories about drug running and money
laundering in Clinton’s Arkansas. We even heard these stories from a
man who ran a CIA front company — a man named Terry Reed, who wrote a
book entitled “Compromised.” But these stories have come and gone.
Nothing was proved by them, no real follow-up investigation took place,
and the public eventually shifted to the more titillating and
comprehensible details of the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Was there a large narcotics operation going on in Clinton’s
Arkansas? I asked John whether he believed what the pilot told him.
“Nothing would surprise me about Clinton,” he said.

John went on to discuss the defense problem under Clinton. “It’s
just obvious the man despises the U.S. military,” he observed. “The
part I don’t understand is how he survived his first term.”

John didn’t explain what he meant by that. Perhaps he didn’t have
to. Other sources I’ve spoken to have alleged the existence of secret
tapes smuggled out of Eastern Europe in the mid-1990s. These tapes
supposedly were used to record the 1970 recruitment of a young American
college student by Czech intelligence. Thirty years later the student
is president of the United States. An incredible allegation, of
course. Totally unbelievable. It is not something that we journalists
should dare to repeat, especially since the tapes have disappeared. One
is forced to regard it as an
unsubstantiated rumor. But maybe that rumor explains John’s inability
to understand how Clinton “survived his first term.” Maybe John knows
something more, which he doesn’t dare explain.

If the story of Clinton’s recruitment by the Czechs is true, where
are the Czech tapes now? The man who had the tapes, a former communist
official, is conveniently dead. It appears that he may have been
slowly, very slowly, poisoned. After an investigation into the
whereabouts of his family, I learned that his wife is living more
comfortably than otherwise might be expected, and a Russian “gentleman”
is living directly across the hall — keeping close watch.

Make of it what you will. There is no proof the president or the
vice president are working secretly with our Cold War enemies. But
there are piles of circumstantial evidence. And this evidence, with all
its disturbing implications, has been published in books like “Year of
the Rat” by Edward Timperlake and William C. Triplett II and


“Betrayal”
by Washington Times reporter Bill Gertz.

The men and women involved in our nation’s intelligence work are not publicity hounds. They do not write columns for the public. They write secret intelligence briefs for the president. But if that president cannot be trusted — what then?

I asked John if his colleagues thought Clinton was a Marxist.

John hesitated a moment, then replied, “It would be surprising to know how many people talk this way.” Then he returned to the subject of strange deaths among those who get too close to the Clintons. “I’ve talked to some police officers involved in this,” he said.

I asked John if he thought the White House was penetrated by foreign intelligence agencies.

“Anyone who thinks we’re not penetrated [at the White House] is naive,” he answered. Then he explained the problem that some American intelligence officers have with the present administration. Some agents feel that somebody has to be told. “It’s a protective mechanism,” he explained. “It’s much easier to make something disappear if it has very little exposure.”

One way to make something disappear is to kill the guy who knows too much. “Hits in broad daylight,” is how John describes it. In one instance, he had dinner with a colleague and three days later the man was dead. “I don’t know what he was doing,” said John. “He must have stumbled across something he shouldn’t have.”

John also spoke of other murders. He spoke of an agent from another government agency. “It’s the same crap,” he said. “If Al Gore wins the election the republic won’t survive another four years.”

If you think John is exaggerating, you should read Bill Gertz’s latest book,

“The China
Threat.”
Patriotic individuals like John provided Gertz with access to highly secret documents that reveal Clinton’s duplicity and Gore’s complete indifference to American security.

According to Gertz, who quotes a Gore aide, the vice president is willing to give China anything it wants if only the Chinese agree to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions. In addition, key figures in the Clinton-Gore Chinese fund-raising scandals have Chinese names — like John Huang, Johnny Chung, Charlie Trie and Maria Hsia. According to Gertz: “They funneled Chinese government cash to the Democratic Party to the tune of some $1.2 million.”

But that is the tip of the iceberg.

American intelligence gathering is a useless enterprise when we have bad or stupid people in the White House. At this moment there are those in the intelligence community who fear a Gore presidency. Perhaps they wish there was something they could say to the U.S. Supreme Court or to the Florida courts that would scare the judges into deciding for one side as opposed to the other. Of course, the judges are obliged to decide each case according to the law.

We can only hope that the objectivity of our courts, and the silence of those who know the truth, will not conspire unwittingly to destroy the republic.

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