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It took Jesse Jackson just hours to hightail it down to Florida and
try to make the election deadlock a racial issue. It took Hillary
Clinton exactly two days to make her presidential aspirations known
after beating Rick Lazio for the junior New York Senate seat. Mrs.
Clinton told the press she is going to introduce legislation that would
deep-six the Electoral College, and institute a pure popular vote in the
next presidential election.

It doesn’t take a Ph.D. in political science to figure out that Mrs.
Clinton would benefit greatly from the demise of the Electoral
College. She knows quite well that she could never carry the states in
the South and West in a run for the White House. But if she clustered
her campaign in the liberal cities and corralled the unions and
minorities with huge giveaways, she just might get enough popular votes
to become president, especially if there was a third party candidate,
which there will be in 2004 (hello Jesse Ventura).

As for the other Jesse, he remains in the sunshine state spreading
anything but sunshine. The reverend, always willing to give the benefit
of the doubt of course, is running around telling everybody the Florida
election process is unfair to minorities and old people and presumably
alligators as well. Interestingly, about the same number of ballots
were disqualified in Palm Beach County in 1996 when President Clinton
carried the state but we heard nothing from Jackson back then.

Rev. Jackson and Hillary Clinton are so obvious it should be a
national joke. These two should be mocked wherever they go. But they
are not mocked. They are actually revered in many places and taken
seriously by the media and millions of Americans.

I will never, ever be able to figure this out.

Naked ambition is one thing. But blatant arrogance is quite
another. On election night, Mrs. Clinton wouldn’t even wait for her
opponent to finish his concession speech before she began her acceptance
remarks. She knew the networks would cut away from Congressman Lazio.
Nobody does this. Even the slimiest of politicians give their
vanquished opponents a few moments. Not Hillary. No way. She wanted
to slip the dagger in between Lazio’s ribs and found a way to do it.

But did the elite media say anything about it? If they did, I missed
it.

And if anyone on television besides your humble correspondent has
criticized Jesse Jackson for demagoguing the election, I missed that as
well. Turning an emotionally charged situation into a racial circus is
reprehensible. But that is exactly what Jackson is doing. Only Bob
Dole had the guts to call him on it. The rest of our leaders continue
to remain silent on the Rev. Jackson.

There was a time in this country when the populace loathed people
like Jackson and Hillary Clinton. Opportunism was not an American
attribute but rather something that was shameful. That has all changed
now and millions of Americans simply shrug when presented with evidence
that powerful people are dishonest or hypocritical or even dangerous.
We have become a society that shuns judgments. Presumably most of us
have values but those values often stay private. We are afraid to
speak out against racial dividers and power mad charlatans who twist the
notion of democracy into a grotesque knot.

People like Hillary Clinton and Jesse Jackson are so transparent it’s
embarrassing. But they don’t feel the need to even pretend
anymore. Steamrolling over a sitting congressman’s concession
speech — sure let’s do it. Organizing demonstrations in the midst of a
presidential recount — right on, Jesse. No restraint is needed, no
dignity is needed, and no love for your country is needed. That’s
because it’s not about their country — it’s about them.

Yet the media will cozy up to these two on almost any occasion and
the folks, well, millions of them are willing to idolize these twins of
destruction. This is very wrong and very disturbing. And I fear for
all of us if the national attitude doesn’t begin to turn around. And
soon.

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