• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

After listening to House minority leader Dick “Too Good To Be True”
Gephardt speak against President Bush’s tax-cut plan, I think I finally
understand how the people of Missouri could actually elect a dead man.

A few weeks ago, Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, in response to
President Bush’s proposed tax-cut plan, quickly moved into damage-inflict
mode. He held a PR meeting and denounced Bush’s tax cut proposal as unfair,
unsound and unequal.

In building his case, he employed the favorite Democrat tactic of
inciting class resentment, railed against the disparate amounts that people
would receive, and actually used props to illustrate his argument.

On one side, he had a shiny, new Lexus that represented what the wealthy
could buy with their tax cut. On the other side, he had a muffler on a table
that represented what a poor, hardworking sod could purchase with his tax
cut.

I suppose that by illustrating the difference between a luxury car and
an exhaust pipe, Daschle figured he would impact the differences more
profoundly and spread class envy equally among his supporters.

After President Bush’s speech before Congress Tuesday night, old Tom and
his cohort, House Minority Leader Dick “Let’s Nix the Electoral College”
Gephardt, sat before the cameras in what was the “Democrats Respond” segment
following the speech.

(And, no, their heads didn’t spin.)

Instead, in smooth, gentlemanly oratory that sounded hauntingly familiar
(Al Gorish, to be precise), they engaged their customary scare-tactics.

Tom “The Muffler Man” Daschle started off by telling the American people
about the hope that filled Washington, D.C., that evening, and that he, too,
wants America to be prosperous. He said he wants a vibrant economy, and that
he would fight for tax cuts — only, not tax cuts that give luxury automobiles to one group
and mufflers to another. Oops! Wait! He didn’t say that, he just said he
wanted to be fair, and that he would fight any proposals that put America’s
prosperity at risk, that might harm Social Security or Medicare — or hurt the
interests of the working people.

He then gave a short history about how he and Dick Gephardt have both
worked for the past 18 years (make that a career) to undo the mess that was
the 1980′s, before weaving into a tale about another era that also began with a
new president who wanted to cut taxes to the wealthy. Back then, however,
that clever president somehow convinced these green statesman that cutting
taxes to the wealthy would have a “trickle down” effect that would fuel the
economy — only instead it burned it out and left a wreckage of deficits, debt,
unemployment, and “America in a ditch.”

(If you can forget for a moment that the era of excess occurred under
their watch, you would understand why they are merely trying to prevent the
same disaster from occurring yet again.)

As wonderful as President Bush’s tax-cut proposal sounds, these two
minority leaders want you to know that they will fight it all the way.
Because, if it passes as is, it would eat up almost the entire budget surplus,
which is essentially all the profit the government has made off the American
people.

And that worries these guys, because in that event (profit-loss), Social
Security could be endangered and people might have to start choosing between
eating or taking their medicine and kids won’t get a decent education and,
basically, the sky could fall — particularly if the defense budget gets
stripped because of such shortsightedness.

It was d?j? vu all over again, only this time it wasn’t Al Gore giving
the doomsday speech, it was the House and Senate minority leaders.

Which leads me to believe that their leading skills leave a lot to be
desired, because anytime a supposed leader uses his position to twist the
truth and to instill fear in the people to garner support, it’s disturbing.

That it’s the Democrat way of doing things is beside the point.

For a country built on truth, it’s un-American.

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.