Once again the United Nations prepares to equate Zionism, the movement for a Jewish homeland, with racism.

On Aug. 31, the U.N. is holding a conference on racism in Durban, South Africa, in which there will be calls for labeling Israel as a nation involved in ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity.

We’ve been down this road before. One of the most shameful episodes in the U.N.’s shameful history came in 1975 when the General Assembly first adopted a resolution equating Zionism with racism. The U.N. adopted that resolution annually until 1991 when the Madrid “peace process” began.

Is there any validity to the claim?

If you want to understand what real racism is, the question needs to be turned around 180 degrees.

What do Israel’s enemies want? Over and over again, we hear, from their own mouths, that they want to destroy the Jewish state and replace it with an Arab state. “Palestine – from the sea to the river” is the favorite expression of this movement. In other words, there is no room for a Jewish state in the Middle East – no matter what the borders are, no matter what concessions Jerusalem is willing to consider, no matter what rights Arabs are granted within Israel.

Isn’t that racist?

In other words, the conflict in the Middle East between Jews and Arabs – at least from the Arab point of view – is not about what kind of government should represent the people who live there. It is about what kind of people should live there.

That has never been Israel’s perspective. In fact, as I have stated in previous columns, the Arabs who live in Israel today enjoy more human and civil rights than their neighbors do in any Arab country.

But let’s explore this issue further. Was it racist when the people of Kosovo – ethnic Albanians, mainly Muslims – wanted independence from Serbia? Evidently not, according to the U.N. In fact, NATO bombed Serbia in an effort to accomplish the objective of an autonomous Kosovo.

Was it racist when mainly Muslim Bosnians wanted to create a separate nation? Evidently not, according to the U.N, which helped ensure the creation and maintenance of such a state.

Was it racist to create a Jewish state in Palestine in 1948? Evidently not, because it was the United Nations that approved the partition that accomplished that action.

I could go on and on, of course. Think of all the national independence movements based on ethnicity and religion that have received the support of the international community in recent years. Why is it that only Israel is now targeted with the “racism” charge?

I have noticed that accusations of racism are most often hurled by racists themselves. And, true to form, those making the allegations against Israel turn out to be the real racists.

I note that those quick to condemn Israel are quiet on the wholesale, government-sponsored, racist land-grabs currently under way in Zimbabwe, for instance. White farmers are being held hostage and murdered in a systematic, orchestrated, forceful and violent campaign of wealth redistribution. Not as much as a whimper of concern is being expressed by the U.N. Conference on Racism.

Nor has the conference expressed outrage at the Sudanese government’s systematic and racist campaign of genocide against black Christians and other non-Muslims in the southern region of the country.

As I said, the contradictions are endless. And, more often than not, many of the same proponents of the “Zionism is racism” campaign not only turn a blind eye to official racism perpetrated by their friends, they often apologize for it and support it.

The United States has threatened to reconsider its participation in the conference in South Africa beginning next month. It should stop threatening to do so and drop all plans to engage in the international public-relations lynching of Israel by this U.N.-sponsored kangaroo court.

The only outcome of such political pontificating will be more racism, more anti-Semitism and, of course, more violence.

 



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