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Terrorists most likely are using U.S. radio broadcasts to communicate with one another, a former intelligence officer for the Lebanese army told WorldNetDaily.

Although now living in the United States, the former military officer fears for the safety of family members still in the Near East and spoke to WND only on condition of anonymity. Throughout this report, he will be referred to simply as Jack.

Jack stated that he feels a “special sympathy” with those who lost loved ones in the Sept. 11 attacks, since he lost family members in a terrorist attack in the early 1980s.

Jack grew up in Lebanon and speaks several foreign languages, including Arabic.

“I know these people inside and out – I know how they do business,” Jack stated.

He warns that Arab terrorists could easily be sending messages using commercial U.S. radio bands, employing extremely subtle signals.

Jack cited as an example a service that accepts radio broadcasts from around the country for retransmission over the Internet. Featuring broadcasts in various languages throughout its 24-hour schedule, the service carries a 28-minute segment listed as a “Taleban” radio relay.

The radio relay apparently originates from the state of Wisconsin.

The segment carries messages from Taliban leaders, including Osama bin Laden and his lieutenant, Abdallah Azzam. In the broadcasts, passages from the Koran are cited, with calls for the faithful to carry on the fight against the infidel.

In addition to propaganda, Jack suspects that more specific – but hidden – instructions may also be included.

As Jack monitored the “Taleban” broadcasts, he noted an abrupt, unexpected change from the classical Arabic, which is used in commentary on the Koran, to one of the local Arabic dialects. He cited the unusual change in language as a possible prearranged signal for operatives in the U.S.

Other anomalies include the unexpected repetition of particular verses from the Koran and a “very calm monotone” voice used by a speaker during an otherwise excited, emotional address, which, according to Jack, “means something bad” for the U.S.

Whatever may be the hidden meaning behind the broadcasts, the overt message to the faithful, Jack stated, is obvious: “America is evil,” and “wherever you (the faithful) may be, don’t give up – you will go to heaven.”

The FBI has been informed of the “Taleban” broadcasts. A spokeswoman for the FBI’s Chicago office, where the report about the broadcasts was made, stated that such tips “are taken seriously” but that the bureau does not comment on information received until an indictment occurs.

The concern over broadcasting terrorists’ messages is not limited to radio. American TV networks have not been airing videotapes of bin Laden speeches provided by Al-Jazeera television for fear the terrorist mastermind is communicating to his followers in a secret code.

Jack warned that the U.S. must also recognize links between Islamic terrorist networks and nations that are secular and socialist.

He cited communist Cuba as a “fertilizing ingredient” for Islamic terrorism and referred to sympathetic ties between Havana and the socialist but predominately Muslim nations of Libya and Iraq.

Both Libya and Iraq have been linked to terrorism for decades, with Baghdad believed to be closely related to bin Laden’s network and possibly even to the events of Sept. 11.

When asked how Islamic fundamentalist terrorists could cooperate with socialist/communist states, Jack responded that the two dissimilar groups share a common bond – hatred of the West.

Observers note another link seldom mentioned during the war on terrorism. The same nations associated with terrorism and hostility to the U.S. – Libya, Iraq, Cuba and Syria, for example – also share the friendship of a very powerful friend, which is presently being courted fervently by the U.S. – Russia.


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