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Parents who are tired of their kids listening to Britney Spears, *NSYNC and the Backstreet Boys now have a more traditional choice – the music of cowboy-singer Buck Howdy.

Steve Vaus, producer of Howdy’s CD, “Skidaddle!” says it gives parents an alternative to the “inappropriate and harmful” music that record companies offer kids.

“It’s time for an old-fashioned cowboy in the mold of Roy Rogers to make a run on doing a kids’ CD,” he said.

Howdy, a Virginia turkey farmer turned singer, reaches his listeners through his Western-themed songs aimed at giving youngsters ages 3-10 fun sing-along music.

“I’m hearing from lots and lots of people that mine is the first music they’ve ever had that they can enjoy as a family, that my music is creating more quality, family time for them – that is an honor,” Howdy told WorldNetDaily.

“He just brings a fresh, delightful sense of wonder and fun to kids’ music,” Vaus said.

One of the reasons Howdy’s CD is doing so well, says Vaus, is the fact that people simply are getting frustrated with the inappropriate messages kids are bombarded with by most of today’s music. He says people are ready for the “down-home, old-time” music that Howdy resurrects.

“Though Buck’s the first cowboy singer in probably 50 years, the time is really right,” Vaus said.

“There’s something about cowboy music that touches everybody,” explains Howdy, “no matter where they live.”

“Skidaddle!” has received good reviews from publications like Parents Magazine, Los Angeles Times and the San Diego Union Tribune.

Howdy’s CD “is a wonderful change of pace from much of the manic programming that leaps out of the small screen at kids today,” said Kenney Curtis from XM Satellite Radio in his review.

Vaus has used music and the radio before to promote better moral values and standards across America. In his “We Must Take America Back” song from his “Never Had a Chance” CD, Vaus calls for an end to drugs, gangs and corrupt leaders, as he explained in a WorldNetDaily column.

After the Monica Lewinsky scandal, Vaus ran radio spots in Washington, D.C., and New York City composed of children’s voices asking Bill Clinton for help with their own irrational behaviors. The “Dear Mr. President” campaign tried to show that the President’s conduct is important to the nation and shouldn’t be taken lightly, because his image creates a role model for children.

Producing several major artists over the years, like Kenny Rogers, Willie Nelson and Patty Loveless, Vaus says he wasn’t planning on doing a kids’ project with Buck Howdy until he heard him sing at a street fair in Virginia. Vaus’ young children “dragged” him over to hear Howdy sing.

“My kids were entranced by this cowboy singer,” he said.

Vaus says he also was intrigued by Howdy and thought the singer’s music was a great alternative to the type of music that makes parents want to “pull their hair out.”

Howdy says he was quite surprised when Vaus first approached him at the fair with the idea of making a CD.

“You could have knocked me over with a feather,” he said.

It didn’t take long for Howdy to decide to make the CD that he has been told is one of the fastest-selling debut kids’ CDs in a long time.

The Howdy CD, Vaus said, “really seems to be finding a sweet spot across the board.”

Related column:

Kid-poisoning music

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