Today’s children and teens – due to their unhealthy eating, drinking, sexual and drug-taking habits – will become the sickest, most mentally ill, obese and infertile adults in the history of mankind, warns a major medical study released yesterday.

In a comprehensive report by the British Medical Association, titled “Adolescent Health,” statistic after statistic shows today’s youth to be a public health time-bomb. A few examples:

 

  • In the UK, one teenage girl in 10 aged 16-19 has the sexually transmitted disease, chlamydia, which can make women infertile.

     

  • One quarter of 15- and 16-year-olds smoke.

     

  • At least one in five 13- to 16-year-olds is overweight or obese.

     

  • Eleven percent of 11- to 15-year-olds reported having used drugs in the previous month.

“Young people in Britain are increasingly likely to be overweight, indulge in binge drinking, have a sexually transmitted infection and suffer mental health problems,” said Dr. Vivienne Nathanson, head of science and ethics at the British Medical Association, according to a report in the London Telegraph.

The report reveals the shocking finding that “up to one in five adolescents may experience some form of psychological problem” – problems ranging from “behavioral disorders to depression, eating disorders, self-harm and neurosis.”

“Mental health problems which develop in adolescence often persist into adulthood and can deteriorate over time,” the report adds. “They are often associated with other problems including risk taking behavior.”

Drinking habits of the nation’s adolescents also are cause for alarm, according to the report, which says, “adolescents in the UK have one of the highest European levels of
alcohol use, binge-drinking (consuming more than five drinks in a row) and getting drunk.”

Specifically, it found that 24 percent of English 11- to 15-year-olds had had an alcoholic drink in the last week: in Scotland the figure for 12- to 15-year-olds was 21 percent in 2000. In 2000, 55 percent of Welsh 15- to 16-year-olds reported drinking at least once a week. In 1999, in Northern Ireland, 66 percent of girls and 70 percent of boys reported drinking in the past 30 days.”

Dr. Russell Viner, a consultant in adolescent medicine at two London hospitals, decried the lack of “services” targeting young people, calling it a “scandal.”

“The next generation will be the most infertile and the most obese in the history of mankind and it might also have the worst mental health,” he said, according to the Telegraph story.

The medical report calls on various agencies and departments of the British government to work together to find solutions to self-destructive teen behavior – including more sex education, drug and alcohol education, and diet and exercise programs in schools.

Today’s teenagers’ behavior, warns Nathanson, poses “an extraordinary threat to an entire generation. We can’t expect young people to think that far into the future. We have to do some of the thinking for them.”

In a report by the London Guardian, Viner – one of the few British consultants to specialize in adolescent health – adds: “We need to develop a coordinated approach to adolescent health that involves health care, education, social services and youth justice system so that we can target all young people including those who may be most at risk such as young offenders, the homeless and people from deprived communities.”

Of course, government agencies are already engaged in various outreaches intended to solve the problems. As an example, a spokesman for the nation’s Department of Health boasted to the Telegraph: “Last year we launched a multi-million pound advertising campaign to encourage safe sex among young people.”

 

Editor’s note: Today’s increasingly bizarre youth culture – pierced, tattooed, and hyper-sexualized – is the focus of the shocking December issue of WND’s acclaimed monthly Whistleblower magazine, titled “KILLER CULTURE.” If you’ve ever wondered why rap music and gangland clothing, extreme “body modification,” every type of sexual experience, drug abuse and other harmful behaviors have taken such a powerful hold on today’s young people – and at progressively younger and younger ages – December’s Whistleblower has the answers you’ve never read anywhere else.

 

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