Font size: Font face:

This is WND printer-friendly version of the article which follows.
To view this item online, visit http://www.wnd.com/2004/01/22929/

MINORITY REPORT

White African-American boy not 'black' enough for award

National debate sparked after Caucasian student seeking 'race-based honor' booted out of school

The Omaha suspension of a white high-school student originally from South Africa is sending shock waves across America as debate rages over who can claim rights to the term “African-American.”


South African native Trevor Richards suspended over African-American campaign

The case centers on Trevor Richards, a junior at Westside High School, who moved from Johannesburg to Nebraska six years ago.

Richards and his classmates, 16-year-old twins Paul and Scott Rambo, were booted from classes last week after distributing posters touting Trevor as a candidate for Westside High’s “Distinguished African-American Student” award on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“The posters were intended to be satire on the term African-American,” Scott Rambo told the Omaha World-Herald.

Principal John Crook says the posters were disruptive.

“It was offensive to the individual being honored, to people who work here and to some students,” Crook told the paper. “My role is to make sure we have a safe environment, physically and psychologically. We can’t allow that kind of thing to be hung up on our walls.”

Records from 2002-2003 indicate only 56 of Westside’s 1,632 students were black, and some in this year’s student body were reportedly upset by Richards’ poster.

Ironically, the first two recipients of the student award were white.

“It was not intended at the beginning to be one race only,” Clidie Cook, who helps organize the annual event, told the World-Herald.

But Westside officials pushed to change that, feeling the spirit of the honor meant giving it to a black student, and by 2001, the ministerial alliance in charge specified it was for blacks only.

Since the suspensions last week, the issue has been picked up by the Associated Press wire service, and has become a hot topic for columnists, talk radio and Internet messageboards.

“There is no room at the inn for the viewpoints of conservatives, libertarians, Christians, or constitutionalists in the public indoctrination system,” says David Huntwork, a conservative activist in Fort Collins, Colo., who criticized the squashing of “this gallant expression of grass-roots activism.”

The ABC television affiliate in Omaha, KETV, has been swamped with comments on its Internet messageboard.

Among the postings:

The label “African-American” is not universally used by blacks today, as evinced by companies and groups such as Black Entertainment Television, the Congressional Black Caucus, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, better known as the NAACP.

A search of more than 200 U.S. newspapers geared predominantly toward blacks finds at least 16 have the word “black” in the title, while only five have “African-American.”

As WorldNetDaily reported last summer, a member of Congress, Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee, D-Texas, ignited national controversy when she reportedly sought an affirmative-action plan of sorts for hurricane names.

“All racial groups should be represented,” Lee said, according to the Hill. She hoped federal weather officials “would try to be inclusive of African-American names.”

 

Previous story:

‘Black’ hurricane names brewing swirl of dissent

© Copyright 1997-2013. All Rights Reserved. WND.com.