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Movies with explicit sex and nudity don’t sell, according to an annual study.

Less than 20 percent of the top 10 movies at the domestic box office in 2001, 2002 and 2003 had excessive or very graphic sex in them, according to Movieguide, the monthly publication of the Christian Film & Television Commission.

Movieguide’s ratings, however, showed 63 percent of the top films had either a moral worldview or a Christian worldview.

“Clearly, sex does not sell as well as the mass media wants us to believe,”
said Ted Baehr, chairman of Christian Film & Television Commission and
publisher of Movieguide.

The study indicted the bigger the amount and the stronger the sex and nudity are in a movie, the worse it does at the box office.

In 2003, for example, 78 movies with no sex averaged $37.6 million; 95 movies with implied sex averaged $32.1 million; 71 movies with briefly depicted sex averaged $25 million; and, 35 movies with extensive, excessive or graphic sex averaged only $17.1 million.

In 2002, 82 movies with no sex averaged $44.3 million; 104 movies with implied sex averaged $23.2 million; 82 movies with briefly depicted sex averaged $20 million; and 31 movies with extensively depicted, excessive or graphic sex averaged only $17.7 million.

In 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003, movies with no nudity averaged $26.6 million, 40.7 million, $35.9 million, and $34.6 million, respectively, but movies with full male and/or female nudity averaged $14.5 million, $7.6 million, $9.1 million and $11.8 million, respectively.

John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theatre Owners, says,
“Family product sells and R-rated product does not.”

The report was released March 24 at the 12th Annual Faith & Values Awards Gala in Beverly Hills.



Related special offer:

MOVIEGUIDE?:The Family Guide to Movies & Entertainment

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