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You might think you’ve heard all the startling revelations about John Kerry’s history from the new book, “Unfit for Command,” by John O’Neill and Jerome Corsi.

Think again.

As I finish reading this book, I continue to find – literally on every page – new information that stuns even me, someone who has watched John Kerry’s career with skepticism and alarm for the last 33 years.

Take this, for instance.

On June 29, 1971, according to an FBI report, Kerry praised Vietnam’s communist dictator Ho Chi Minh, comparing him to George Washington.

At the time, Kerry was serving as the point man for the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. The president of the organization was Al Hubbard, who claimed to be an Air Force captain who was severely injured during his service in Vietnam. It turned out Hubbard was a sergeant who never served in Vietnam. He did, however, as Kerry knew, serve the communist cause with great enthusiasm and distinction – making propaganda trips to Hanoi paid for by the Communist Party USA.

Kerry didn’t distance himself from Hubbard even when the lies were uncovered. In fact, he rationalized them. Kerry didn’t distance himself from Hubbard when he became aware, as an executive committee member of VVAW, that its actions were being coordinated and sponsored, in part, by the communists.

Furthermore, Kerry himself made two trips to Paris to meet with representatives of the enemy.

He was also present at VVAW steering committee meetings in which debates took place about assassinating three U.S. senators. Kerry, of course, did not report these crimes to any authorities. Kerry tried to say he had quit the organization before these meetings. Now he claims his memory is hazy about what took place – that he doesn’t recall hearing any of these dire plots.

Of course, his fantasy about being in Cambodia during Christmas 1968 is “seared” in his memory banks. Yet, he has no recollection about his fellow executive committee members discussing murder plots.

Is it any wonder with that kind of track record that Kerry would tell extraordinary lies for 30 years about spending time in Cambodia on illegal missions? Is it any wonder he would tell extraordinary lies about atrocities by American troops? Is it any wonder that he would tell extraordinary lies about his own “heroics” on the battlefield?

What is a wonder is the fact that 33 years later Kerry has enough credibility left to make run for the presidency on a major party ticket.

I keep hearing other commentators talk about his honorable record of service in Vietnam. They must not be reading this book very carefully. They must not be listening to those with whom Kerry actually served. They must be listening only to Kerry’s own public relations machine.

John Kerry dishonored America and the uniform of the U.S. Navy long before he got back to the states and betrayed his fellow servicemen with lies about atrocities.

According to nearly everyone he served with in Vietnam, Kerry was a self-serving malcontent from the day he arrived in Vietnam for his brief four-month visit. He was disgruntled. He avoided combat. He didn’t obey orders. But he did go beyond the call of duty in the pursuit of one objective – seeking medals and commendations and a shortened stay in Vietnam.

It’s way past time for my colleagues in the news media to join me in calling on Kerry to execute Standard Form 180, which would release to the public all his military and medical records for examination by the American people before Election Day. So far, he has not done so, despite the demands of more than 250 of his fellow Vietnam veterans.

This refusal continues even after Kerry made his Vietnam experience the very cornerstone of his campaign beginning with his acceptance speech at the convention.

If we’re to believe Kerry’s war experience somehow distinguishes him for consideration to be the next president, if we’re to believe that record of achievement is so distinguished, if we’re to believe the portrait painted at the convention is true, why would Kerry hesitate for even a moment to release his service records, to release his medical records and even his own journal and films from Vietnam for public inspection?

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