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In recent weeks, John Kerry has crossed the line from the traditional American position of “loyal opposition” in his fierce and self-contradictory criticism of President Bush’s policies in Iraq.

He crossed that sometimes blurry line in a free society to the point where he is endangering Americans’ lives and giving aid and comfort to the enemy.

The man who urged pre-emptive military action in 1997 and who voted to authorize the invasion now says a policy of regime change was all wrong – simply to position himself as a viable political alternative to the president.

But Kerry is sending even more potentially dangerous and deadly signals to another enemy – one the United States must decide how to confront in the coming weeks and months.

That enemy is the soon-to-be nuclear-armed, fanatical mullah regime in Iran.

Over the weekend, there were reports Iran has developed the range and targeting capability of missiles and is now capable of hitting London, Berlin, Paris and, of course, all of Israel.

Iran is on the verge of becoming a nuclear power, and, despite the regime’s claims of only wanting to build a reactor for peaceful energy uses, it is also moving rapidly to begin reprocessing weapons-grade plutonium.

In addition, there were new reports that Iran has been talking to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad about the possibility of providing safe haven for former Iraqi nuclear weapons scientists.

Despite these ominous developments, Kerry’s campaign rhetoric is making it more difficult for the United States to address the imminent threat posed by Iran.

For instance, listen to what Teresa Heinz Kerry told an audience in Colorado over the weekend:

The way we live in peace in a family, in a marriage, in the world, is not by threatening people, is not by showing off your muscles. It’s by listening, by giving a hand sometimes, by being intelligent, by being open and by setting high standards.

In case anyone wasn’t certain which nation she was talking about, Heinz Kerry elaborated – even mentioning Iran by name and denouncing the administration’s warnings to Tehran: “There are about 50 countries in the world that have the capability to build nuclear weapons. Are we going to attack them all?” she said.

It should be of grave concern to every American that among Kerry’s top fund-raisers are three Iranian-Americans who have been pushing for dramatic changes in U.S. policy toward Iran.

I’m talking about Hassan Nemazee, 54, an investment banker based in New York, who has raised more than $100,000. Why is he betting on Kerry? Read Teresa’s lips.

I’m talking about Faraj Aalaei, who has raised between $50,000 and $100,000 for the Kerry campaign. Why is he betting on Kerry? Read Teresa’s lips.

I’m talking about his wife, Susan Akbarpour, whom the Kerry campaign also lists as having raised between $50,000 and $100,000 for the campaign. Why is she betting on Kerry? Read Teresa’s lips.

And the Iranians may not have to read Teresa’s lips. There may be more direct communication at work between Kerry and the terrorist-supporting mullah regime.

Last February, WorldNetDaily reported that Iran’s official Mehr News Agency had received an e-mail from Kerry’s campaign pitching the candidate as one who will “repair the damage done” to international relations by Bush.

Yes, once again, Kerry is doing what he always does – what he has done ever since he came to the attention of the American people in 1971 and, in fact, what first brought him to the attention of the American people.

He is giving aid and comfort to the enemy.

But, this time, the enemy is not a group of communists in black pajamas with conventional weapons. This time, the enemy is a soon-to-be nuclear-armed jihadist nation with one goal in mind – destroying the “Great Satan,” otherwise known as the United States of America.

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