Minnesota Sen. Norm Coleman wants U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan to quit his job, retiring U.S. Envoy John Danforth thinks the United Nations is not doing its job, and Pat Buchanan and conservative guru Paul Weyrich want the United States to get out of the scandal-ridden international organization.

As usual, Buchanan puts it about as bluntly as it can be put: “The enemy is not Kofi, who will become a Third World martyr if forced out in the absence of proof of personal corruption. Let him stay seated atop his compost heap until the aroma grows so great Americans demand it all be bulldozed into the East River as a public nuisance,” Buchanan wrote in his column today.

Both he and Weyrich make a good case for their demands. The oil-for-food scandal at $21 billion plus is the largest rip-off in international history and at the very least it demands that the man in charge should either quit or be tossed out – something that this gutless bunch cannot bring themselves to do despite the growing evidence that Annan’s son Kojo was up to his ears in the looting of the oil-for-food scam.

Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Sen. Coleman charged that Saddam Hussein defrauded the oil-for-food program of $21 billion that was supposed to go for humanitarian aid.

“We have obtained evidence that Saddam doled out lucrative oil allotments to foreign officials, sympathetic journalists and even one senior U.N. official,” he wrote. “We are gathering evidence that Saddam gave hundreds of thousands – maybe even millions – of oil-for-food dollars to terrorists and terror organizations … under the supposedly vigilant eye of the U.N.”

The “senior U.N. official” Coleman mentioned is Benon Sevan, Kofi’s hand-picked head of the oil-for-food program, who he insists “reportedly received bribes from Saddam.”

“As long as Mr. Annan remains in charge, the world will never be able to learn the full extent of the bribes, kickbacks and under-the-table payments that took place under the U.N.’s collective nose,” Coleman said.

But the scandal, as shockingly corrupt as it is, is not America’s real problem with the United Nations. That problem is the United Nation’s hostility to the concept of national sovereignty. Deep in its collective breast the United Nations believes it should be the world’s ultimate authority and all nations should bow before it.

As Pat Buchanan put it, the United Nation’s hidden agenda – the International Criminal Court, the World Trade Organization and the Kyoto Protocol – is to curtail America’s freedom to act in its own interests and to create a world government erected on a one-man, one-nation, one-vote principle.

Buchanan notes that under a one-world government, India and China, with 2.5 billion people, would be the dominant powers. “Global democracy,” he warns, “is the death of the West.”

“With the idea of global governance out of the closet, with the European Union the model – with the United Nations the embryo – the real threat to America comes into view: a loss of sovereignty and eventually the loss of independence.”

Indeed, the United Nations has proven to be especially hostile to America’s refusal to surrender our sovereignty in such matters as the International Criminal Court, which would have overridden the constitutional rights of Americans and subjected us to the jurisdiction of a foreign judicial body had not President Bush wisely revoked the treaty signed by former President Clinton embracing the authority of the ICC.

I agree with Sen. Coleman: Kofi Annan must go. And I agree with Pat Buchanan and Paul Weyrich: It’s time for the U.S. to quit this toothless organization of corrupt, power-hungry bureaucrats.

I like the way Paul Weyrich put it: “The current U.N. cannot live without the United States. We pay about a quarter of its budget and for what? To have us slapped down by a group of bloodthirsty dictators who hate our system of government? To have human rights abuses investigated by a committee composed of the worst human rights violators on the face of the earth? To have U.N. people run for cover as soon as the situation gets tough in Iraq? For the life of me I can’t figure out any benefit to staying in the U.N.”

Neither can I.

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