Dr. Jack Wheeler, creator of a unique intelligence website dubbed “the oasis for rational conservatives,” shares how a gift of vodka and a little ingenuity helped Ukraine’s Orange Revolution succeed, bringing the former Russian satellite onto President Bush’s list of new democracies.

On his website, To the Point, Wheeler begins his column with a defense of the president’s inaugural address and his call for peace through freedom, explaining the principle of “democratic pacifism.”

“If two countries are real democracies, the odds of them going to war against each other are small, very small,” Wheeler explains. “History gives no guarantees for the future. But if you want a peaceful world – a world without war and terrorism – then your absolute best chance is to replace tyrannies with freely elected constitutional governments.”

Wheeler then turns to the recent success of Ukraine’s Orange Revolution, which ushered in the democratically elected Viktor Yushchenko after his supporters virtually shut down the government in protest of the first presidential election, which fraudulently resulted in the victory of Yushchenko’s Russian-backed opponent.

“Eastern Ukraine is heavily ethnic Russian. The main industry is coal. The miners are rough, tough, and hate Yushchenko for wanting to take Ukraine away from Russia and toward the West,” writes Wheeler. “It was arranged for more than a thousand of them to be taken from Donetsk, the capital of the coal-mining region, by bus and train to Kiev, where, armed with clubs and blunt tools, they would physically beat up the Orange Revolutionaries. Such mass violence was not only to disperse the demonstrators but serve as an excuse for the government to declare martial law, suspending the Ukrainian Parliament (the Rada) and elections indefinitely.”

Now comes the secret weapon: vodka.

“When the miners got on their buses and trains, they found to their joy case after case of vodka – just for them. When they arrived in Kiev, trucks awaited them filled with more cases of vodka – all free provided by ‘friends’ of the Donetsk coal miners. Completely soused, they never made it to Independence Square. Too hammered blind to cause any violence at all, they had a merry time, passed out and were shipped back to Donetsk.”

Available only to subscribers of To the Point, Wheeler’s column goes on to explain who provided the liquor: teams of Porter Goss’ CIA working with their counterparts in British MI6 intelligence.

Writes the intel expert: “Just take a moment and reflect on how stone-cold brilliant this was. The forethought and planning it took, the innovative thinking. Bush doesn’t send the Marines – he sends the vodka! – and achieves a democratic revolution. This is the sort of thinking, these are the sorts of tactics, that are going to be applied now for ‘ending tyranny in our world.’ Military force will be used only as a necessary resort.”

Subscribe to Wheeler’s To the Point intelligence website and read how he draws a key parallel between the Reagan Doctrine and the Bush Doctrine, and reveals what he sees as the “vodka” that will be used to bring freedom to Iran.

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Besides writing for To the Point, Wheeler heads the Freedom Research Foundation, which currently is working on what he calls the Free Iran Project. The project applies “Reagan Doctrine strategies toward the liberation of Iran,” he explained.

The website is global, Wheeler says, “but we really focus on issues people are really interested in … key areas of geo-strategic and national security import for the United States.”

‘Religion without a future’

Wheeler said Islam is also a focus of To the Point, including “the nature of Islam and the problems Islam faces – with regard to us and with regard to its own future.”

“Quite frankly,” he said, “there are a lot of extinct religions in the history pages, and Islam is going to become extinct unless it’s reformed.

“When you start blowing yourself up, when you get that kind of insane desperation, you’re history,” he said. “This is a religion without a future unless it reforms.”

On his site, Wheeler includes a subscription article comparing the Aztecs with Arabs: “Both the Arabs and the Aztecs invented a religion of jihad as a rationale to justify their imperialist empires. …”

“War – Holy War – became the purpose of the Aztec state. All soldiers in the Aztec army were holy warriors, warriors of the gods. Peace was dangerous. No war meant no prisoners to sacrifice, no food for the gods, which risked the destruction of mankind and the universe itself. The only way to avoid cosmic disaster was for the Aztecs to accept the burden fate had given them and wage perpetual war for the salvation of humanity.

“All in all, a pretty clever rationalization for a monstrous imperialist tyranny, wouldn’t you say? Sounds like they were taking religion-inventing lessons from the Arabs.”

Adventure in his blood

Wheeler, who holds a doctorate in Philosophy, has always been drawn by the thrill and accomplishment of adventure. He became the youngest Eagle Scout in history at age 12 before becoming the youngest person to climb the Matterhorn in Switzerland at age 14.

“People collect things,” Wheeler explains. “They collect stamps, or coins, or porcelain. At 14, I decided what I wanted was to collect extraordinary experiences. You could lose your stamps or coins, but you can never lose what you have done with your life.”

Wheeler swam the Hellespont like Leander in Greek mythology, was adopted into a tribe of Amazon headhunters and successfully hunted a man-eating tiger in South Vietnam while still in high school.

“My intellectual adventures began when I read Ayn Rand, Ludwig von Mises and Aristotle, inspiring me to get a Ph.D. in Philosophy,” he said. “I explored Africa, the Gobi, Mongolia, Central Asia, Tibet, the Himalayas, the Andes, Borneo and the South Pacific, discovered lost tribes in New Guinea and the Kalahari, took elephants over the Alps in Hannibal’s footsteps, skydived onto the North Pole, roused anti-Marxist guerrillas from Angola to Afghanistan and helped get rid of the Soviet Union.”

Forty years after Wheeler’s historic climb of the Matterhorn, he ascended the mountain again, this time with his 14-year-old eldest son, Brandon.

Wheeler completes his column entitled “What life is all about” this way:

“No lion, sitting underneath an acacia tree in the Serengeti, asks himself, ‘What does it mean to be a lion? What is the purpose of my existence?’ A lion has no choice but to unselfconsciously follow his genetic program. But human beings have to figure out how and why to survive, they have to choose a rationale that gives purpose and meaning for their lives. My choice has been to try and make my life, and now the life of my son, a thrilling adventure.”

Wheeler has worn many labels throughout his decades as an adventurer and geopolitical expert. The Wall Street Journal called him “the originator of the Reagan Doctrine.” The Washington Post called him “The Indiana Jones of the Right,” and Izvestiya, the organ of the Soviet Communist Party, called him an “ideological gangster.”

Wheeler says his site offers readers “mind-stretching pro-America insights on our lives, our politics and our world.”

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., sums up Wheeler’s extraordinary life:

“Jack Wheeler is just about the most interesting man I know. As a professional adventurer, he has discovered lost tribes and led expeditions to every corner of the globe. As a geopolitical strategist, he created the Reagan Doctrine, which led to the demise of the Soviet Union. He is a brilliantly original thinker and deeply perceptive analyst of world events. I value his counsel and friendship.”

Here’s how Wheeler describes his online resource:

“To The Point intends to be both the world’s most accurate and insightful geopolitical intelligence service, and a pro-America, pro-capitalist, pro-Western Civilization intellectual ammunition service for defenders of liberty.

“Our goal is for our subscribers to look upon To The Point as an oasis of reason and insight. Our subscribers are becoming the most highly informed people in America.”

Subscribe to Dr. Jack Wheeler’s To the Point.

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