Reports of Christian persecution in Pakistan are on the rise with one man getting his arm hacked off and a family kidnapped, assaulted and tortured.

A Muslim customer allegedly assaulted a Christian shopkeeper in the small village of Talwandi, Punjab province, according to Asia News. After the shopkeeper, Shahbaz Masih, refused to rent a TV to Ahmed Ali, a butcher, Ali reportedly insulted Masih for being a Christian and left the store. He later returned with a butcher’s ax and allegedly hacked off Mashi’s left arm near the elbow.

As he left, Ali allegedly threatened the victim and his widowed mother with even more “dire consequences” for the supposed insult he had endured.

Asia News reported Masih, 22, spent four days in the hospital and then closed his shop and fled the village with his mother.

According to the report, a group of Christian leaders from the area filed a complaint with the police and Ali was arrested. Local police reportedly are under heavy pressure to whitewash the case and free Ali.

In another incident, Hanifan Bibi, 55, who worked as a domestic servant for a Muslim family, and three male relatives were abducted and abused for two days.

According to Barnabas Fund, which monitors Christian persecution worldwide, Bibi, her husband, son and nephew were at home in Lahore Jan. 10 when they were kidnapped, allegedly by her employer’s husband and others.

They were driven to an unknown destination and kept there for two days without food or water, the organization reported. Bibi’s nephew was suspended upside down naked and beaten with a hot metal pipe, while Bibi was stripped, forced to drink wine, photographed, videotaped and severely beaten, the report states.

The other two victims also were beaten. Barnabas Fund reported that after the ordeal the family was taken to a police station and accused of stealing money and jewelry from Bibi’s employer.

The family says the abduction was in retaliation for Bibi’s refusal to provide the men of her employer’s family with Christian women for sex.

The human-rights group says many Christian women are illiterate and earn their living as ill-paid domestic servants, often for affluent Muslim families. They are very vulnerable to abuse and rarely dare to complain, Barnabas Fund says, fearing the influence of their employer in the local community.

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