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Editor’s note: The Rev. Thomas J. Euteneuer contributed to and was the key inspiration for this commentary.

Many critiques of “The Da Vinci Code” have focused on the book’s self-serving historical revisionism, its scurrilous attacks on the Christian church, the “creative” use of Mary Magdalene and such, but I’ve not seen the full extent of “Da Vinci’s” paganism explored. As the other side of the coin of the attack on the church, Dan Brown’s total immersion of his readers into pure pagan ideology is wicked. I liken it to drops of rain falling in an ever-increasing intensity and ferocity on the reader as the storyline unfolds.

Brown starts “Da Vinci” with lots of superficial exciting narrative and a light drizzle of rather innocuous pagan concepts like “the divine feminine.” About a quarter-way through the book he whets the reader’s appetite with a partial description of a satanic orgy which he calls “sacred marriage.” Exactly mid-way through the book he has the reader sitting obediently at the foot of his main pagan guru, Leigh Teabing, an “expert” on the Holy Grail, who functions as the main indoctrinator of the book.

With Teabing, Brown begins to rain an immense shower of pagan values and their glory on the reader whose mind by now has been dilated by the warm lusty rain. By the last quarter of the book, Brown has his reader engaged in the full explosion of his satanic “marriage ceremony” and links the key to the secret of the Holy Grail with a horned goat-faced male fertility god named Baphomet. Whew – that’s not easy to do, but Brown plies his craft well.

From beginning to end Brown’s book is pagan, even satanic, propaganda. Don’t believe me? Then read the following partial list of references which Brown admits time and again in the book are ostensibly pagan in origin:

Hi?ros gamos (a Greek term which he calls “sacred marriage”); Satanic pentagrams (which he sanitizes as “pentacles”); pyramids (one consisting of 666 glass panels); keystones; obelisks; astrology; fertility cults and rituals; goddess cults, goddess art and worship; Wicca; nature worship and Mother Earth; yin yang; witches and crones; “the sacred feminine;” Masonic ciphers, secret codes and puzzles; esoteric knowledge and hidden symbolism; secret societies, lodges and cults; alchemy; Egyptian gods and goddesses; Tarot cards; crystals; magic; anagrams; a pagan astrological device known as gnomon; The Rose Line, Rosslyn and the Rosslyn Chapel; a 33-foot Egyptian obelisk in a church; the secret Masonic brotherhood; fertility rituals performed by people on the spring equinox wearing masks and holding orbs; ritual nudity and chanting; gargoyles; hermaphrodites; Native American “wisdom;” pagan May Day; Friday the 13th; sun worship …

I’m only half way through this list!

Rosicrucianism; nature-worshipping festivals; pagan priestesses and their instruments: wands, ankhs, rattles and pagan statues; the Obelisk of Ramses; the number 13; phallic symbols; Gnosticism and the Gnostic gospels; the Wiccan five stations of female life; pagan myths and stories; the Astrological Age of Pisces; the New Age of Aquarius; the Luciferian motto: do as you please; Egyptian priests and priestesses; meditation gurus; Nirvana; the fertility god Baphomet; the goddess Sophia/Wisdom; papyrus scrolls with secret messages; the pantheon of gods; Stonehenge; circular churches for pagan fertility rituals; Knights Templar; freemasons; constellations, signs of the zodiac, comets, stars and planets; the Goddess of Astronomy; sarcophaguses and tombs; Eve and the Apple in the Garden; a Mithraic temple with a powerful magnetic field; cornucopias; Masonic seals; stargazing priests and pillars of the Temple of Solomon which are in all Masonic temples.

Keep in mind that some of the references and terms on this list are repeated dozens or even hundreds of times throughout the book serving to thoroughly wash the reader’s brain with this pagan junk.

Now, if that is not enough to convince you that Brown wants to supplant the good old-time religion, here’s another list of pagan gods and goddesses or other (even biblical) names that Brown uses with fully pagan meanings: Adonis, Amon, Aphrodite, Ariel, Astarte, Aurora, Baphomet, Dionysius, Eve, Eros, the Eastern Star, Hermes, Horus, Ishtar, Isis, Krishna, Mars, Medusa, Mithras, Osiris, Pisces, Poseidon, Venus and Zeus. Even the name of the main female character, Sophie Neveu, sounds like the French term, sophie neuveau, which means “new wisdom.” How ironic that the main female character of the book is spun as the incarnation of the goddess Sophia!

Friends, “The Da Vinci Code” is a very cleverly-concocted piece of pagan propaganda that bathes unsuspecting brains with an incessant shower of verbal grime. There is no redeeming value to it for any person of moral fiber, and I suspect that once Dan Brown gets done testifying in court for allegedly infringing on the copyrights of other pagan books, he may just go back to his fertility den to worship the millions he has filched off a gullible public.



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