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WASHINGTON – Are secret meetings being held between the corporate and political elites of the U.S., Mexico and Canada to push North America into a European Union-style merger?

Is President Bush’s reluctance to control the border and enforce laws requiring deportation of foreigners who enter the country illegally part of a master plan to all but eliminate borders between the U.S., Canada and Mexico?

Does the agenda of the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America include a common currency that would scrap the dollar in favor of what some are calling the “amero”?

It may be the biggest story of the 21st century, but few press outlets are telling it. In fact, until very recently, few in the U.S. were aware of the plans and even fewer denouncing what appears to be the implementation of an effort some have characterized as “NAFTA on steroids.”

But opposition is mounting.


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CNN’s Lou Dobbs

Perhaps the most blistering criticism has come from Lou Dobbs of CNN – a frequent critic of Bush’s immigration policies.

“A regional prosperity and security program?” he asked rhetorically in a recent cablecast. “This is absolute ignorance. And the fact that we are — we reported this, we should point out, when it was signed. But, as we watch this thing progress, these working groups are continuing. They’re intensifying. What in the world are these people thinking about? You know, I was asked the other day about whether or not I really thought the American people had the stomach to stand up and stop this nonsense, this direction from a group of elites, an absolute contravention of our law, of our Constitution, every national value. And I hope, I pray that I’m right when I said yes. But this is — I mean, this is beyond belief.”

What has Dobbs and a few other vocal critics bugged began in earnest March 31, 2005, when the elected leaders of the U.S., Mexico and Canada agreed to advance the agenda of the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America.

No one seems quite certain what that agenda is because of the vagueness of the official declarations. But among the things the leaders of the three countries agreed to work toward were borders that would allow for easier and faster moving of goods and people between the countries.

Coming as the announcement did in the midst of a raging national debate in the U.S. over borders seen as far to open already, more than a few jaws dropped.


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Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo.

Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo. and the chairman of the House Immigration Reform Caucus as well as author of the new book, “In Mortal Danger,” may be the only elected official to challenge openly the plans for the new superstate.

Responding to a WorldNetDaily report, Tancredo is demanding the Bush administration fully disclose the activities of the government office implementing the trilateral agreement that has no authorization from Congress.

Tancredo wants to know the membership of the Security and Prosperity Partnership groups along with their various trilateral memoranda of understanding and other agreements reached with counterparts in Mexico and Canada.

Jim Gilchrist, co-founder of the Minutemen, welcomed Tancredo’s efforts.

“It’s time for the Bush administration to come clean,” Gilchrist said. “If President Bush’s agenda is to establish a new North American union government to supersede the sovereignty of the United States, then the president has an obligation to tell this to the American people directly. The American public has a right to know.”

Geri Word, who heads the SPP office, told WND the work had not been disclosed because, “We did not want to get the contact people of the working groups distracted by calls from the public.”

WND can find no specific congressional legislation authorizing the SPP working groups nor any congressional committees taking charge of oversight.

Many SPP working groups appear to be working toward achieving specific objectives as defined by a May 2005 Council on Foreign Relations task force report, which presented a blueprint for expanding the SPP agreement into a North American union that would merge the U.S., Canada and Mexico into a new governmental form.

Phyllis Schlafly, the woman best known for nearly single-handedly leading the opposition that killed the Equal Rights Amendment, sees a sinister and sweeping agenda behind the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America.

“Is the real push behind guest-worker proposals the Bush goal to expand NAFTA into the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America, which he signed at Waco, Texas, last year and reaffirmed at Cancun, Mexico, this year?” she asks. “Bush is a globalist at heart and wants to carry out his father’s oft-repeated ambition of a ‘new world order.’”

She accuses the president and others behind the effort of wanting to obliterate U.S. borders in an effort to increase the Mexican population transfer and lower wages for the benefit of U.S. corporate interests.

“Bush meant what he said, at Waco, Texas, in March 2005, when he announced his plan to convert the United States into a ‘Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America’ by erasing our borders with Canada and Mexico,” she said. “Bush’s guest-worker proposal would turn the United States into a boardinghouse for the world’s poor, enable employers to import an unlimited number of ‘willing workers’ at foreign wage levels, and wipe out what’s left of the U.S. middle class. Bush lives in a house well protected by a fence and security guards and he associates with rich people who live in gated communities. Yet, for five years, he has refused to protect the property and children of ordinary Arizona citizens from trespassers and criminals.”

That’s unusually harsh criticism of a Republican president from one of Ronald Reagan’s most loyal supporters.

At least one of the nation’s daily newspapers has officially weighed in in opposition to the mysterious plans for closer cooperation in security, commerce and immigration between the three North American nations.

Recently, the Pittsburgh Tribune Review questioned the unchallenged momentum toward merger.

“Will Americans trade their dead presidents for Ameros?” the newspaper asked in an editorial last month.

The paper chided efforts at replacing the U.S. and Canadian dollars and Mexican peso with “the amero” – a knockoff of the euro – along with the building of “a looming NAFTA-like superstate.” Citing the meeting between the three national leaders at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, in March 2005, the editorial warned: “Canadians, Mexicans and Americans who value the sovereignty of their respective countries should be concerned.”

The Tribune Review editorial saw synergy between the plans of the national leaders and the ambitious agenda of the Council on Foreign Relations – seen by many as a kind of secretive, shadow government of the elite. The CFR issued a bold report in the spring of 2005, shortly after the joint announcements in Waco by Bush and his counterparts.

“The Council on Foreign Relations published a report in May — “Building a North American Community” — calling for, among other things, redefining the borders of the three nations, creating a super-regional governance board and the North American Paramilitary Group to ensure that Congress does not interfere with whatever the trilateral union feels like doing,” said the paper. “Must the Bush administration happily sacrifice every shred of American sovereignty for the greater good of the New World Order?”

In fact, the CFR report is a five-year plan for the “establishment by 2010 of a North American economic and security community” with a common “outer security perimeter.”

Some see it as the blueprint for merger of the U.S., Canada and Mexico. It calls for “a common economic space … for all people in the region, a space in which trade, capital and people flow freely.”

The CFR’s strategy calls specifically for “a more open border for the movement of goods and people.” It calls for laying “the groundwork for the freer flow of people within North America.” It calls for efforts to “harmonize visa and asylum regulations.” It calls for efforts to “harmonize entry screening.”

In “Building a North American Community,” the report states that Bush, Mexican President Vicente Fox and Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin “committed their governments” to this goal March 23, 2005, at that meeting in Waco, Texas.

Alan Burkhart, who describes himself as a free-lance political writer, cross-country trucker “and proud citizen of one of the reddest of the Red States – Mississippi,” is another critic seething over these plans that seem to have a life of their own – with little or no real public debate.

“As time passes, American corporations will find it unnecessary to move their facilities out of the country,” writes Burkhart. “Our already stagnant wages will be just as low as those of Mexico. The cultures of three great nations will be diluted. Our currency will be replaced with the ‘Amero.’ And, we’ll be one giant step closer to the U.N.’s perverse dream of a one-world government.”

The Amero is not a new concept. It was first proposed by the Fraser Institute, a Canadian think tank, in a monograph titled “The Case for the Amero” in 1999.

Last month, the Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America made one of its most visible and public moves since it was first announced last year. In Washington, on June 15, U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez, Mexican Economy Minister Sergio Garcia de Alba and Canadian Minister of Industry Maxime Bernier joined North American business leaders to launch the North American Competitiveness Council. It was a major development that showed the March 2005 meeting was no fluke – and that the plans announced by the three national leaders then were continuing to take shape. The NACC was first announced by Bush, Harper and Fox.

Made up of 10 high-level business leaders from each country, the NACC will meet annually with senior North American government officials “to provide recommendations and help set priorities for promoting regional competitiveness in the global economy.”

Officially, the council has the mandate to advise the governments on improving trade in key sectors such as automobiles, transportation, manufacturing and services. The three countries do more than $800 billion in trilateral trade.

Gutierrez said the Bush administration is determined to develop a “border pass” on schedule despite worries about its implementation. The new land pass is to be in effect for Canadians, Americans and Mexicans by Jan. 1, 2008.

The U.S. executives involved in the NACC include: United Parcel Service Inc. Chairman Michael Eskew; Frederick Smith, chairman of FedEx Corp.; Lou Schorsh, chief executive of Mittal Steel USA; Joseph Gilmour, president of New York Life Insurance Co.; William Clay Ford, chairman of Ford Motor Co.; Rick Wagoner, chairman of General Motors Corp.; Raymond Gilmartin, CEO of Merck & Co. Inc.; David O’Reilly, chief executive of Chevron Corp.; Jeffrey Immelt, chairman of General Electric Co.; Lee Scott, president of Wal-Mart Stores Inc.; Robert Stevens, chairman of Lockheed Martin Corp.; Michael Haverty, chairman of Kansas City Southern; Douglas Conant, president of Campbell’s Soup Co. and James Kilt, vice-chairman of Gillette Inc.

The concerns about the direction such powerful men could lead Americans without their knowledge is only heightened when interlocking networks are discovered. For instance, one of the components envisioned for this future “North American Union” is a superhighway running from Mexico, through the U.S. and into Canada. It is being promoted by the North American SuperCorridor Coalition, or NASCO, a non-profit group “dedicated to developing the world’s first international, integrated and secure, multi-modal transportation system along the International Mid-Continent Trade and Transportation Corridor to improve both the trade competitiveness and quality of life in North America.”

The president of NASCO is George Blackwood, who earlier launched the North American International Trade Corridor Partnership. In fact, NAITCP later morphed into NASCO. A NAIPC summit meeting in 2004, attended by senior Mexican government officials, heard from Robert Pastor, an American University professor who wrote “Toward a North American Community,” a book promoting the development of a North American union as a regional government and the adoption of the amero as a common monetary currency to replace the dollar and the peso.

Pastor also was vice chairman of the May 2005 Council on Foreign Relations task force entitled “Building a North American Community” that presents itself as a blueprint for using bureaucratic action within the executive branches of Mexico, the U.S. and Canada to transform the current trilateral Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America into a North American union regional government.


Related offer:

Get Tom Tancredo’s new book, “In Mortal Danger,” for just $4.95.


Previous stories:

More evidence of Mexican trucks coming to U.S.

Docs reveal plan for Mexican trucks in U.S.

Kansas City customs port considered Mexican soil?

Tancredo confronts ‘super-state’ effort

Bush sneaking North American super-state without oversight?

Related column:

Coming soon to U.S.: Mexican customs office

Merger with Mexico

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