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In a strange response to a question from WorldNetDaily at today’s White House press briefing, presidential press secretary Tony Snow utilized legalese in an attempt at humor, later apologizing for using “legal jargon.”

Asked WND: “Since Hezbollah is a terrorist organization that has killed hundreds of Americans, why is it that the president wants Israel to cut short its war to destroy its infrastructure, since that is what the president pledged to do to all international terrorist organizations after September the 11th?”

Playing the role of courtroom judge, Snow responded: “Counselor, the question is argumentative, presumptuous and makes assumptions not in evidence.”

WND told Snow the query was a “network question,” meaning it had come from WorldNetDaily headquarters.

“Let me just apologize personally to the network for legal jargon,” said Snow.

WND then questioned Snow about Maryland’s lieutenant governor and Republican U.S. Senate candidate, Michael Steele, who has said, according to the Washington Post, that being a Republican is “like wearing a scarlet letter,” and that he does not want President Bush to campaign for him this fall.

Asked WND: “Since … Mr. Steele has, in effect, told the president to stay away from his campaign, are you just going to respond to this with an icy silence or an irritable evasion?”

Snow responded, “We have the broad sweep of literary history here. Let’s walk through a couple of things. I am told by some of the reporters who were at the scene that it was mischaracterized. But I will leave to people who were there to characterize more fully the statements that were made.

“Number two, the president, the first lady, the president’s father, I believe the vice president – the vice president, Karl Rove – this administration has been in Maryland campaigning for Michael Steele. We want him to become the next U.S. senator.”



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