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Liberty Counsel, the nonprofit litigation, education and policy organization that has been at the center of the religious freedom wars in our nation, and Jerry Falwell Ministries are again joining together this year to promote the national “Friend or Foe Christmas Campaign.”

This is the fourth year of the endeavor, which is designed to educate Americans – primarily retailers, school administrators and city officials who have attempted to eradicate celebrations of Christmas – of the legalities of religious expression during the Christmas season.

Last year’s operation was our most successful ever, and we are hoping more pastors and citizens will join in this effort this year.

The primary way in which people are getting involved is by placing ads in their local newspapers that spell out the rights of individuals to participate in public Christmas functions.

Liberty Counsel, which has offices in Orlando, Fla., and on the campus of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., has hundreds of affiliate attorneys in all 50 states who are pledged to be the “friends” to those individuals which do not censor Christmas and a “foe” to those that do. Last December, ABC’s “Good Morning America” assessed Liberty Counsel’s Friend or Foe Christmas Campaign during an interview with me. The host observed that the campaign had ignited a “movement.”

Indeed it did. Newspaper ads ran all over the country and people joined together to tell retailers who banned expressions of Christmas that they would shop elsewhere.

Last year, Liberty Counsel successfully handled scores of cases in defense of Christmas, including a lawsuit against two Florida towns that would not permit a nativity scene in a public park. Liberty Counsel intervened in numerous other situations last year.

As a result, Boston stopped calling its Christmas tree a “holiday tree”; Wellington, Fla., allowed a Nativity scene to join a Christmas tree and a menorah; state employees were allowed to have Christmas parties instead of generic “holiday parties”; schools included religious songs in their choral presentations; students were allowed to recognize the Christian aspects of Christmas; retailers started wishing shoppers “Merry Christmas” instead of “Happy Holidays” and renamed their “holiday trees” “Christmas trees.”

Many individuals in our nation have been convinced by the ACLU and other organizations that wish to quell public religious expression that simple expressions of the Christmas season are promotions of religion. Nothing could be further from the truth.

I’m urging people to get involved in this issue so that we can turn back these anti-Christmas organizations’ efforts to stifle public Christmas expressions.

On its website, Liberty Counsel offers a Help Save Christmas? action pack, which includes educational legal memoranda to educate government officials, teachers, parents, students, private businesses, employees and others that it is legal to celebrate Christmas. The legal memo will educate you on how to defend Christmas.

You can also get “I Love CHRISTmas”? buttons, “I Helped Save Christmas” bumper stickers, and sample newspaper ads – designed by my National Liberty Journal newspaper staff – that can be used, free of charge, in local newspapers.

The ads point out that celebrating Christmas is still legal in schools, on public property and in private businesses, and offer Liberty Counsel’s free legal assistance to those facing persecution for celebrating Christmas.

Anita Staver, president of Liberty Counsel, said, “Christmas is constitutional. We cannot allow our religious liberty and heritage to be swept from the public square.”

When enough people learn the truth – that we can celebrate the religious aspects of Christmas – the ACLU and similar “Scrooges” and “grinches” will lose their power to steal Christmas.

Let’s join together to safeguard Christmas in America.



Related special offers:

“Just Say Merry Christmas” wristband

The Reason for the Season auto magnet

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