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Illegal aliens crossing the U.S.-Mexico border will reportedly be given handheld satellite devices by Mexican authorities to help them survive their illicit journey.

Migrants who get lost or sick during the four-day crossing will be able to activate the high-tech device to alert police on both sides of the border.

“Our intention is to save lives,” Jaime Obregon, coordinator for the state commission for migrants in Puebla, the Mexican state behind the project, told the London Telegraph. “There are lots of people looking to cross and we are working with the U.S. authorities to make sure they do not die on the way.”

It’s estimated between 20 and 30 illegals fall victim to scorching temperatures and insect bites while making the dangerous trip each year. Many end up wandering aimlessly in the desert after heat exhaustion triggers short-term memory loss.

Ironically, the satellite tracking requires would-be illegals to register their intentions at the outset of their journey, despite the fact secrecy is a usual component for successful entry into the U.S.

Still, Mexican officials expect some 200,000 devices will be handed out when the project is officially launched this year.

According to Mexican authorities, up to 75,000 attempt to enter Arizona at Sasave Pass every month, of whom between 50,000 and 60,000 are caught by U.S. agents and sent back.

Many pay up to $10,000 for human guides known as coyotes, who have a reputation of being merciless.

“If you cannot keep up, they will abandon you,” said Obregon. “Alone, you have about 36 hours to live. It is in this period the satellite device makes a difference.”

“We do not have any information about the Mexican government providing satellite trackers to people,” a spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection said, “but we strongly discourage encouragement to people who are attempting to cross illegally into the U.S.”

Aiding illegals in their entry to the U.S. has not been exclusive to Mexico or the summer months.

As WND reported in December 2004, the U.S. itself took wintertime measures to provide what some might call a warm welcome for the lawbreakers.

Border Patrol agents in Arizona were issued blankets and “heat packs” to help those suffering from the effects of cold weather.

Get Rep. Tom Tancredo’s “In Mortal Danger” direct from the people who published it – WND Books.


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