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The elephant and the rope

Posted By Janet Porter On 05/01/2007 @ 1:00 am In Commentary | Comments Disabled

Once upon a time, there was a great big elephant named “Mighty” who lived at the circus. But “Judge,” a mean circus trainer, renamed him “Tiny” and put a big heavy chain around his leg so he couldn’t escape. Mighty tried and tried to break free from the heavy chain, but he failed and failed. He heard the stories, but he never knew what it was like to run free in the jungle as his parents had done.

When Judge would see Mighty try to break free, he would hit him with a big stick. “Tiny, you will never be free.” He said it over and over and louder and louder. And he hit poor Mighty again and again. Mighty didn’t like the mean words or the way that stick felt, so finally, he quit trying. He quit dreaming. And he even forgot his name.

Then, young Mighty grew up. That heavy chain couldn’t hold him any longer, but because Judge had beaten him down for so long, Mighty didn’t even try. In fact, that chain was replaced with a teeny tiny rope tied to a little bitty stake in the ground.

One day, some troublesome teens came to the circus and saw Mighty tied up behind the big tent. One bully was named TV and the other one was called PC (he liked to point out how “incorrect” everyone was). They started pelting Mighty with trash and rocks shouting, “What are you going to do about it – huh, Tiny?”


Mighty looked down and saw the little rope and hung his head low – trying to turn away from the stinging, pelting rubbish being thrown at him. They spray painted the word “Tiny” on him and punched and kicked poor Mighty.

Then a little girl called Trudy came and chased the bullies away. She was little, but she had a big loud voice and wasn’t afraid to use it. She walked up to Mighty and held out her hand full of peanuts. “Hello, Mr. Elephant,” she said. “My name is Truth – but they call me Trudy – even though I hate it.” Mighty moved closer to the little girl to taste the peanuts from her hand.

“You’re so big your name can’t be ‘Tiny’ like the sign says. What is your real name?”

Mighty thought hard. “Everyone calls me ‘Tiny.’”

“Everyone calls me Trudy, but that doesn’t mean it’s my name. I’ll bet your name is ‘Big,’ or ‘Powerful,’ or ‘Mighty,’ or something like that!”

Mighty couldn’t believe his elephant ears. He remembered! “Yes! That IS my name! My name is Mighty!”

Truth reached into her pocket and brought out another handful of peanuts. “Well, if your name is mighty, then you better start acting like it!”

“What do you mean?” asked Mighty. “I can’t do anything; I’m tied to this rope.”

“You call that a rope? As big as you are, you could snap that in a second!” said Trudy.

“No, Judge said I can’t, and TV and PC told me I’m bad and stupid and weak.”

“Those bullies? You’re going to listen to bullies? What is your name again?” asked Truth.

“My name is Tin – uh, Mighty,” said Mighty.

“And what do you want to do Mighty?” asked Truth.

There was no answer. Mighty had forgotten.

“Don’t you want to be free?” urged Trudy.

Mighty looked down. “Of course, but it’s not so bad here. They feed me what they want and I eat it, and I get to walk two steps forward and two steps back.”

“Two steps? Say what you want, but that’s not free. Two steps forward and two steps back is the same as going nowhere!” exclaimed Truth.

“What do you want?” Truth asked a final time.

“I want to be free,” said Mighty.

“Then snap the rope,” the little girl replied, matter of factly.

“But …” replied the beaten down Elephant.

Truth interrupted, “What is your name?”

“My name is … Mighty,” said Mighty.

What is your name?” asked Truth.

“Mighty,” said Mighty more elephantphatically.

“WHAT IS YOUR NAME?” she asked a third time.

“MIGHTY!” And with that Mighty snapped the rope. He kissed Truth on the cheek with his trunk and ran free to the woods where he lived happily ever after.



That really is what they do to elephants in the circus – beat them down and hold them captive with a tiny little rope. That’s what they’ve done to Christians, too. The Christians: the ones who say dismembering children is wrong and stand for marriage between a man and a woman. The ones who believe the Bible, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution – including the part about our unalienable rights being endowed by our Creator. But we’ve been beaten down so long that we’ve forgotten our name. We are Christians – sons and daughters of the Most High God. The Almighty God who empowers and enables us to move mountains and snap ropes. He came to set the captives free.

So forget what the judges say – we have the power to limit them and impeach them and replace them. Forget what’s PC and what the TV says. I’d rather listen to Truth.

We’ve been playing by the opposition’s made-up rules. Treated worse than an elephant in a circus act, Christians have been ridiculed, blamed, assaulted, censored, fined, fired and thrown in jail.

The bullies of the courts, the media, the educators, the legislators and Hollywood have beaten us with big sticks only because we have stood by and let them. Like we did last week when H.R. 1592, the “thought crimes” bill to criminalize Christianity passed the House Judiciary Committee. Bullies have always fought against what is right. And just like the playground, appeasement always equals more bullying and less freedom. So, quit reacting and responding, and start using our freedoms while we still can.

Christians, it’s time to snap the rope.

This week, the U.S. House will likely vote on whether to send pastors to jail for disagreeing with the homosexual agenda in a “thought crimes” bill, H.R. 1592. Television ads to expose it are now running on CNN nationally and Fox News in Washington, D.C. Go to (and link to) StopHateCrimesNow.com to help. Then call your representative and senators at 202-224-3121 and tell them to vote NO on H.R. 1592 – before doing so becomes a “hate crime.”

Next week: More ways to snap the rope.



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