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The path has been cleared for the state of Texas to begin building the new Trans-Texas Corridor, a project that is designed to be four football fields wide, along Interstate 35 from Mexico to the Oklahoma border, according to a new report from WND columnist Jerome Corsi, the author of “The Late Great USA.”

The way was opened when Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican, vetoed a series of proposals the Texas Legislature assembled to slow down the work on what is considered to be a key link in a continental NAFTA superhighway network.

Perry’s latest veto was of a plan to add a number of requirements to the Texas eminent-domain procedures, under which governments can grab and use private property.

But, Corsi reported, Steven Anderson of the Institute for Justice’s Castle Coalition, objected. He said Perry’s action “left every home, farm, ranch and small-business owner vulnerable to the abuse of eminent domain.”

Earlier, Corsi reported, Perry vetoed a plan to impose a two-year moratorium on the TTC project.


As WND previously reported, these measures were approved overwhelmingly by the Texas Legislature.

On learning that Perry had vetoed the eminent-domain legislation, Corridor Watch, a public advocacy group that opposes the TTC project, responded immediately.

“It sure didn’t take TxDOT long to shake off the legislative session and resume their headlong rush to use every available loophole, exception and remaining authority to build toll roads and grant toll road concessions just as fast as possible,” the organization said.

Corridor Watch also noted that in the 49 bills Perry vetoed June 15 were measures that would have required TxDOT to consider using existing highway routes for future TTC routes and a bill that called on the Texas attorney general to study the impact of international agreements on Texas.

An override of Perry’s vetoes is unlikely, since the governor threatened to call a special session of the lawmakers to handle transportation issues if his veto fell by the wayside.

As WND has previously reported, the $180 billion needed to build the 4,000-mile TTC network planned for construction over the next 50 years will be financed by Cintra Concesiones de Infraestructuras de Transporte, S.A., a foreign investment consortium based in Spain. Cintra will own the leasing and operating rights on TTC highways for 50 years after their completion is complete.

WND also has reported Perry has received substantial campaign contributions from Cintra and Zachry Construction Company, the San Antonio-based construction firm selected by TxDOT to build out the TTC.

And WND has established that Cintra is represented in the United States by Bracewell and Giuliani, Republican Party presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani’s Houston-based law firm.

Just this week, WND reported TxDOT already is moving to apply its four-football-fields-wide NAFTA superhighway plan of building new train-truck-car-pipeline corridors to the states of Oklahoma and Colorado in a design that stretches from the Mexican border at Laredo, Texas, to Denver, Colo.

WND has documented a significant reason for the projects is to connect truck traffic from Mexican ports on the Pacific, such as Lazaro Cardenas, to U.S. roads. Mexican ports are being increasingly used as an alternative to West Coast ports such as Los Angeles and Long Beach as a cheaper, non-union alternative for the import of millions of containers from China.

WND also has reported the Department of Transportation plans to start a Mexican truck demonstration project as early as Aug. 15, despite continuing objections from Congress.



Related offer:

Get Corsi’s latest book, autographed: “The Late Great USA: The Coming Merger with Mexico and Canada”


Previous stories:

NAFTA superhighway extends north

NAFTA superhighway lobbying moves north

Anti-’superhighway’ bill prompts backlash

Battle with feds brewing over ‘superhighway’

Feds threaten Texas over superhighway funds plan

NAFTA Superhighway hits bump in road

Houston: The Wal-Mart of North American Union

Commerce chief pushes for ‘North American integration’

Idaho lawmakers want out of SPP

Texas Ports plan for Chinese containers

‘Don’t pave our land’ Farm Bureau pleads

Lawmaker battles Trans-Texas Corridor

House resolution opposes North American Union

U.S. parkway leased to Aussie firm

Residents of planned union to be ‘North Americanists’

Official calls super highway ‘urban legend’

10 most underreported stories of 2006

PREMEDITATED MERGER

Congressman battles North Americanization

North American Union leader says merger just crisis away

Analysts: Dollar collapse would result in ‘amero’

U.S. dollar facing imminent collapse?

London stock trader urges move to ‘amero’

‘Bush doesn’t think America should be an actual place’

Mexico ambassador: We need N. American Union in 8 years

Congressman: Superhighway about North American Union

‘North American Union’ major ’08 issue?

Resolution seeks to head off union with Mexico, Canada

Documents reveal ‘shadow government’

Tancredo: Halt ‘Security and Prosperity Partnership’

North American Union threat gets attention of congressmen

Top U.S. official chaired N. American confab panel

N. American students trained for ‘merger’

North American confab ‘undermines’ democracy

Attendance list North American forum

North American Forum agenda

North American merger topic of secret confab

Feds finally release info on ‘superstate’

Senator ditches bill tied to ‘superstate’

Congressman presses on ‘superstate’ plan

Feds stonewalling on ‘super state’ plan?

Cornyn wants U.S. taxpayers to fund Mexican development

No EU in U.S.

Trans-Texas Corridor paved with campaign contributions?

U.S.-Mexico merger opposition intensifies

More evidence of Mexican trucks coming to U.S.

Docs reveal plan for Mexican trucks in U.S.

Kansas City customs port considered Mexican soil?

Tancredo confronts ‘superstate’ effort

Bush sneaking North American superstate without oversight?


Related commentary:

Superhighway a ‘crazy conspiracy theory’?

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