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So, let me get this straight. Some local yahoo, say, tags my car with racial epithets or something of that nature. It makes the news and angers black folks. Months later, a white man is beaten nearly to death by some black guys in a bar. Am I to believe that the reasonable upshot ought to be the media and a cadre of professional civil rights activists descending on the city and thousands marching in the streets justifying the beating because my car got tagged?

Is that what I’m supposed to believe – and am I supposed to agree that public outrage over prosecution of the perpetrators of that beating is justified?

You calling me stupid?

“The Jena 6″ – it even sounds like the ’60s, which is exactly where the media and the poverty pimps (the aforementioned professional civil rights activists) want to keep America in spirit.

“Enough is Enough!” say the T-shirts.

“Free the Jena 6!” the crowds chant.


Why? They nearly beat a man to death.

Jena, Louisiana (CNN, Sept. 19, 2007):

There is no link between the nooses hung by white students outside a Louisiana high school and the alleged beating of a white student by black teens, according to the U.S. attorney who reviewed investigations into the incidents.

Some residents say nooses hung from a tree on campus sparked the violence that landed the Jena 6 in jail.

And that premise, my friends, is the erroneous kernel of inaccuracy that brought Jena, La., to where it finds itself now.

The facts

On Aug. 31, 2006, a black student at Jena High School sat in the shade of a tree frequented by white students at the school. Later, three nooses were found hanging from the tree.

Scott Windham, the school’s principal, recommended expulsion of three white teens identified as the responsible parties, but was overruled by the school superintendent and board members, who (yes, idiotically) put the matter down as a “prank.” The three students were given three-day suspensions.

Unsurprisingly, racial tensions flared at the school and in Jena that fall. On Nov. 30, 2006, part of the school was destroyed by a suspected arson fire. Other minor altercations and fistfights were reported; one black student was attacked at a party by white students.

On Dec. 4, 2006, a fight that broke out in the high school lunchroom between a white student, Justin Barker, and a black student. Barker was rendered unconscious, then kicked and stomped by a group of black students as he lay motionless. Five of the teens were later charged as adults with attempted second-degree murder. A sixth teen was charged as a juvenile.

Mychal Bell, one of the five, was convicted in June 2007 on a reduced charge: aggravated second-degree battery. He was to be sentenced this month, but on Sept. 14 an appeals court vacated the on the grounds that the charges should have been brought in juvenile court.

As the result of a flyer and massive e-mail campaign begun by the NAACP, the Bell conviction and now-popular tie-in to the noose incident, the series of events began to gain national attention. Alarmist, inflammatory media circulated by the NAACP describing Jena as a “highly segregated rural Louisiana town” fanned the flames, which were subsequently doused with accelerant by the press.

The circus comes to town

Associated Press, Sept. 20, 2007: “This is not about race,” the Rev. Al Sharpton said Wednesday. “This is not about politics. It’s not about black and white. It’s about equal justice for all.

“We didn’t come to start trouble; we came to stop trouble,” he said.

“We’re going to walk past the scene of the crime, where this tree was. … This is a march for justice. This is not a march against whites or against Jena.”

Right. … It’s about Al Sharpton getting more face time.

The facts of course don’t matter when we’re dealing with another Al “waste of nucleic acids” Sharpton production, which the march on Sept. 20 essentially became. Equating this unfortunate phenomenon with legitimate civil rights events of old (as Sharpton, Jesse Jackson and Martin King III have done) and misleading blacks vis-?-vis its origins and significance is insulting and obscene.

FoxNews, Sept. 19, 2007:

Jesse Jackson Raps Barack Obama for ‘Acting White’

Jesse Jackson on Tuesday ripped presidential candidate Barack Obama for “acting like he’s white” by failing to bring attention to the case of six black kids arrested on attempted murder charges in Jena, La.

“If I were a candidate, I’d be all over Jena,” Jackson said. …Jackson called the incident in Jena “a defining moment, just like Selma was a defining moment.”

Really? Then why wasn’t Jackson himself “all over Jena,” if it was such a pivotal juncture in history? One wonders why Jackson is giving Obama such frosty treatment (rather at a distance, I might add) after having endorsed him on March 29. Perhaps he’s decided to put his money on another horse.

The underreported

This case has been portrayed by the news media as being about race. … This case is not and never has been about race.

– LaSalle Parish Louisiana District Attorney Reed Walters, Sept. 19, 2007 (CNN)

It is abundantly clear that public officials in Jena are about as contrite as they could be regarding the noose incident and clear about their wish that the school superintendent and board should have elected to punish those responsible more harshly, whilst maintaining that the severity of the reaction to the trial of the “Jena 6″ has been activist- and media-driven.

The media did not reveal that Mychal Bell, who was convicted of battery in the Barker beating, was convicted a year ago for battery and committed three additional crimes while on probation, making the Jena 6 verdict his fifth conviction for a crime of violence.

Like I said, so much for the facts.

Incidentally, my car was tagged with racial epithets some years ago, right here in the predominantly white city where I live. Turns out it was done by a black guy who lived a few doors down and thought I acted “too white.”

I swear it.



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