A Newsweek story critical of Rep. Ron Paul and labeling the NAFTA Superhighway a baseless conspiracy theory has generated approximately 250 adverse reader responses on the “comments” section of Newsweek’s website, many citing hard evidence that the proposed transcontinental trade corridor is quite real.


U.S. Rep. Ron Paul

“There is a broad coalition of Americans developing across the United States who are opposed to a North American Union and know that Ron Paul is right and we need to take action now before it is too late,” Jesse Benton, national press secretary for the Ron Paul Presidential Campaign 08 told WND.

Particularly interesting among Newsweek’s reader comments were citations of Canadian government websites that openly discuss and declare plans to create a NAFTA Superhighway.

Several readers pointed to a Canadian government video clip gaining wide circulation on the Internet. It involves a Nov. 20 “Speech from the Throne,” in which John Harvard, lieutenant-governor of the Province of Manitoba, Canada, opened the second session of the 39th assembly of the provincial legislature with comments proclaiming support for the development of a “Mid-Continent Trade Corridor.”

“Manitoba is also taking a major role in the development of a Mid-Continent Trade Corridor, connecting our northern Port of Churchill with trade markets throughout the central United States and Mexico,” Harvard told the legislature.

“To advance the concept,” Harvard continued, “an alliance has been built with business leaders and state and city governments spanning the entire length of the Corridor. When fully developed, the trade route will incorporate an ‘inland port’ in Winnipeg with pre-clearance for international shipping.”

A video posted on YouTube shows excerpts from Harvard’s speech juxtaposed with clips of President Bush and Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper at the press conference of the third summit of the Security and Prosperity Partnership in Montebello, Quebec, on Aug. 21, ridiculing the North American Union and the NAFTA Superhighway as baseless conspiracy theories.

 


A Destination-Winnipeg trade group website identifies the Mid-Continent Trade Corridor as “the northern gateway of this vast Corridor, a network of highways and railways linking the business community with cities to the south, through the U.S. and into Mexico.”

The Canadian government’s Canada Transport website describes the Mid-Continent International Trade Corridor as a rail and highway network which stretches from Manitoba to Mexico.

Other Newsweek readers provided links to an Alberta government website.

The Ministry of Infrastructure and Transportation in Alberta, Canada, has posted on its website a trade corridor map that shows a NAFTA Superhighway clearly designated in the same route, including Interstate Highways 35, 29 and 94, that the North America’s SuperCorridor Coalition, or NASCO, designates as the I-35 NAFTA Superhighway.

Craig Offman of the National Post writes that this Alberta map of the NAFTA Superhighway on the Alberta Government website is currently Number Two on the popular U.S. web site Digg.com.

“Well, now, Mr. Paul might think he has some real fodder,” Offman writes. “The Ministry of Infrastructure and Transportation website uses the exact phrase, showing a thoroughfare that begins in Manitoba and drops all the way down to West Texas.”

“Why would the Canadian government web page in Alberta show a NAFTA Superhighway if the highway doesn’t exist?” asks a Newsweek reader linking to the Alberta site. “Keep on lying to the people, Newsweek, it is what you do best.”

“We have had that map with the NAFTA Superhighway on our website for 5 years or more,” Jerry Bellikka, director of communications for the Alberta Ministry of Infrastructure and Transportation told WND in a telephone interview.

“The website is a site for truckers,” Bellikka explained. “We try to harmonize our trucking regulations with Canada and the United States so truckers can log on and see where they fit on our requirements when they are traveling along these North American corridors.”

WND asked Bellikka if the Alberta Ministry of Infrastructure and Transportation had any intention of changing the NAFTA Superhighway map on its website.

“No,” Bellinkka answered directly. “We have no plan to change the designation of NAFTA Superhighway on our website.”

 


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