• Text smaller
  • Text bigger


border=0>

The movie “Juno” will be released in six days, on Christmas, and I can’t wait. I previewed it a month ago and loved it.

That means pro-aborts will hate it. “Juno” is a great story that undermines almost all their talking points.

“Juno” is the third in an unplanned pregnancy movie trilogy, the others being “Waitress” and “Knocked Up,” in which a girl undergoes a crisis pregnancy but heroically rejects abortion.

Don’t be thrown that Juno’s screenwriting ing?nue, Diablo Cody, is a stripper turned blogger turned movie writer. She handled the topic almost like we would, only with spice.

Here’s Juno’s premise, by movie reviewer Matthew Turner:

Engaging, frequently hilarious teen comedy with a terrific script, a wonderful cast and a delightful central performance from rising star Ellen Page.

Ellen Page stars as brainy 16-year-old Juno MacGuff, who gets pregnant the first time she has sex with fellow virgin Paulie Bleeker (Michael Cera). Unable to go through with an abortion, Juno decides to give the baby up for adoption, so she finds childless couple Mark and Vanessa (Jason Bateman and Jennifer Garner) through the want ads.

However, as Juno spends more time with Mark and Vanessa, she realizes that their marriage isn’t quite as picture-perfect as it first appeared. Meanwhile, Juno’s father (J.K. Simmons), stepmother (Allison Janney) and best friend Leah (Olivia Thirlby) offer as much help as they can.

I have to jump to my favorite part of the movie, which pro-aborts will hate most, when Juno decides to “procure a hasty abortion.”

The pro-life protester greeting Juno at the mill is a nerd but friendly. She and Juno engage in a civil conversation, and she ultimately gets the job done by calling out to Juno, “Your baby has fingernails!” as the teen determinedly proceeds into the mill. This little humanizing point grabs Juno, causing her to change her mind and ditch the abortion.

Diablo’s portrayal of the abortion mill and workers is hysterical. The uncaring receptionist’s face is laden with piercings. She uncouthly tells Juno to list “every score and every sore” after offering her a fruit-flavored condom. The place is cold.

Here are more facets of “Juno” pro-aborts will hate.

Juno is hurt when Bleeker agrees with her to “nip it in the bud,” or abort. Abortion is not a wonderful “right.” It is borne of tragedy and pain and feeling trapped and alone.


Juno’s father and stepmother are nice, smart people who support her.

Ultrasound is shown as a bonding experience.

Adoption is presented as a heroic option. Open adoption is described, although Juno opts for a closed adoption. She does pick the parents she wants to raise her baby, which is common these days but not so publicized a facet of the changing face of adoption. Watching this process in “Juno” will be instructional.

The deep maternal instincts of the infertile adoptive mother (Garner) are shown as a positive aspect of womanhood.

Juno is a gusty little hero. She bears with aplomb the judgment of school administrators and classmates as her belly grows.

The movie’s ending is unexpected, a cliffhanger, yet happy. It goes almost as social conservatives would want it to go, but not completely. There will be a few complaints.

But I got over it. What little we have to pick apart does not compare to what pro-aborts will have to pick apart, which is everything else. Yahoo.

Last week, “Juno” was nominated for three Golden Globes, including best comedy, best actress in a comedy and best screenwriter.



Related special offers:

“ENDING ABORTION: How the pro-life side will win the war”

“Struggling for Life: How our Tax Dollars and Twisted Science Target the Unborn”

“Lime 5: Exploited by Choice”

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.