• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

Late Wednesday night and early Thursday morning, there was a lunar eclipse. If you witnessed the event, you saw a sphere in the night sky that turned a deep, shadowy red – it was like looking at the moon through Hillary’s economic and social plan.

The event was commonly referred to as “The eclipse that saved Columbus.”

The story behind “The eclipse that saved Columbus” is quite useful as a model in understanding why Al Gore gets away, virtually unchallenged – at least in most government and many private circles – with his claims of man-made “climate change” (which will become “global warming” again for the summer months as Al’s been bright enough to realize that “global warming” sounds stupid when it’s sub-zero and you’re up to your wallet in snow).

After reading a bit about “The eclipse that saved Columbus,” it occurred to me that Christopher Columbus was, in at least one way, a predecessor to Al Gore.

The documented hypocrisies of Gore seem to loudly suggest he doesn’t believe in his own cause, and you would think that people would be more prone to doubt your warning that the sky is falling if your every other action implies that you deny the existence of gravity – but this isn’t always the case. When engaged in business activities – and don’t think Gore doesn’t hope to turn Carbon Credits, Inc. into a fortune 500 company (if it isn’t already) – believing in your own product isn’t always important. What is important is that the consumer believes in it.

This leads us to the reason why Al Gore may well be “Christopher Columbus, v2.0.”

The story begins more than 500 years ago, when Columbus and his men found themselves stranded on the coast of Jamaica and running out of food. The natives wanted them gone, weren’t interested in helping out in any way and were growing increasingly hostile. In short, Columbus and his men were being treated like the Marine Corps in Berkeley.

Columbus had with him an astronomical almanac, and he realized that a total eclipse of the moon would occur on Feb. 29, 1504 – the next day. As the story goes, Columbus then told the native leaders that if they didn’t help his men by giving them food and supplies, he would make the moon disappear from the sky the following night.

The next night, after the moon disappeared, the natives pleaded with Columbus to make the moon reappear – which he did (as far as the natives were concerned), after receiving guarantees that he and his men would be provided as much food as they needed. Columbus and his crew were subsequently rescued.

Columbus took a naturally occurring phenomenon and successfully twisted it into something he claimed was “man made” in order to fulfill a particular agenda. How come this sounds so incredibly familiar?

At least Columbus’ goal was to stay alive and not just get rich, though I’m sure he could have cleaned up if he’d have had time to come up with a “lunar credits” scheme and sought to ensure that everybody, with the exception of himself, lived a solar-neutral lifestyle.

Even though the aforementioned event is called “the eclipse that saved Columbus,” it wasn’t the eclipse that saved Columbus and his men – it was the natives’ lack of education and understanding of the occurrence itself that saved Columbus and his men.

Al Gore follows the Columbus model to the letter, and for the most part, it still works. Proof-positive of how little we’ve actually progressed in some areas in the last 500 years.

Some of the same people marching in lock-step behind Pied Piper Al and his hybrid, low-emission pan flute may look back on the Jamaican natives Columbus fooled and chuckle at their lack of understanding of a natural event. These same people are giving themselves a preview of how they may well be viewed a few hundred years from now.

The beauty of “The eclipse that saves Al Gore” is that it works time and time again, with no need to wait for a particular alignment of heavenly bodies – a phenomenon that, by the way, is probably caused by man-made climate change.

I just thought you’d like to know why, last Wednesday night, you may have heard somebody yelling, “Buy carbon credits from me, and I’ll bring the moon back!”

(Author’s note: Some details on the Columbus eclipse were discovered, if you will, via this story.)

 


Related special offers:

“Global Warming or Global Governance?” DVD

“The Sky’s Not Falling!”

“HYSTERIA: Exposing the secret agenda behind today’s obsession with global warming”

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.