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… but the snippets from the sermon and sound bite having made me the target of hatred. Yes, that is something very new and something very, very unsettling.

– The Rev. Jeremiah Wright, “Bill Moyers Journal,” April 25, 2008

The “Bill Moyers Journal” puff piece featuring the Rev. Jeremiah Wright was what one might expect from the veteran journalist interviewing a politically far left individual. Moyers was sickeningly fawning; Wright was calm, but the message was still black nationalist drivel, albeit substantially toned down compared to what Americans have witnessed of late. His attempt at martyrdom over being made a “target of hatred” was nothing less than laughable. Toward how many Americans, alive and dead, ethnic groups and individuals did he direct abject hatred in those video montages?

On Monday at the National Press Club, Wright was back to his old melodramatic, provocative self – either that or he was generating more so-called rare “snippets.” I’m not certain what the lascivious, Redd Foxx gyrations Wright employs signify other than that he’s a coarse individual, but he was so verbally offensive that Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama found it necessary to condemn Wright’s words, employing the strongest terms he has used to date.


In a press conference on Tuesday, Obama stated that he was “outraged” and “saddened.” I don’t doubt that he is, although his reasons likely reach much further than the deep personal disappointment he expressed.

The person I saw yesterday was not the person that I met 20 years ago.

– Barack Obama, April 29, 2008

Wasn’t he? Wright’s histrionics on Monday validated the argument that his inflammatory outbursts were probably far more frequent than Wright, Obama and the senator’s supporters have asserted since the video excerpts from his sermons first aired. It therefore stands to reason that Obama was exposed to similar rants during his 20 years at Trinity United Church, something he has repeatedly denied. This makes the Wright issue a direct and ongoing threat to Obama’s campaign, regardless of any affirmation or detraction he may advance in this area.

This most recent attack … is an attack on the black church.

– The Rev. Jeremiah Wright at the National Press Club, April 28, 2008

Even if one does not concur that the motives behind Wright’s antics include personal aggrandizement, his declaration that the media attention he has received of late is an attack on the black church was irresponsible, dangerous and a profound hypocrisy. It was irresponsible and dangerous in that such a statement is bound to foment anger within the black community, whether it was calculated to do so or not. It is a hypocrisy because, in short, Wright clearly relishes the attention. These words also carried the inference that an attack on him was tantamount to an attack on the black church, a conceit usually reserved for megalomaniacal cult leaders and New Testament Pharisees.

The real attack on the black church came during the late 1960s and 1970s, when far left and segregationist Democrats, capitalizing on the civil rights legacy of Jack and Bobby Kennedy, ingratiated themselves to the black community. Leaders therein – predominantly pastors – were either duped by the same altruistic propaganda far left Democrats have been selling for the last 40 years, or seduced by the promise of fortune and glory. Jeremiah Wright became a direct beneficiary of the emerging civil rights activism industry.

The “establishment” with which Wright claimed to be at odds on Moyers’ program no longer exists. It has been replaced by an establishment of elites and oligarchs for whom class (position, money and power) mean far more than race. In the United States, the far left has made disturbingly deep inroads into our sociopolitical fabric – in a large measure via the exploitation of America’s Jeremiah Wrights and their flocks. It is they who more so represent the establishment and corporate media to which Wright referred.

Thus, it is a major objective of the press to lend credibility to caricatures such as Wright. Following men like Wright will serve to keep blacks in cultural darkness; believing that these men represent a significant portion of blacks in America will keep whites at a distance. The mutual ignorance this will perpetuate can only be detrimental to race relations in America – which is precisely the condition the far left desires.

Meanwhile, on April 27, in a ceremony similar to Islam’s circling of the Kaaba, Wright’s black “church” celebrated Trinity Unity Day by circling the church building seven times in a ritual intended to “re-consecrate” the site.


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