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There are a million stories to tell. And Andrew Breitbart and his assembled team are ready to tell them. The big news in conservative Internet circles this week is the launch of Big Hollywood, a big group blog intended to change the entertainment industry. It features hundreds of conservative libertarian minds from the fields of politics, journalism, entertainment and culture.

“Big Hollywood is a continuous politics and culture posting board for those who think something has gone drastically wrong and that Hollywood should return to its patriotic roots,” Breitbart said.

“Until conservatives, libertarians and Republicans – who will be the lion’s share of Big Hollywood’s contributors – recognize that (pop) culture is the big prize and that politics is secondary, there will be no victory in this important battle.”

Best In Class

A blogger who has moved on to Big Hollywood is Dirty Harry which leads me to the red carpet announcement of the Blog Stars of 2008. Which blogsites are the best in their class? The envelope please!

Tah dah! And the winner is…

It’s the 6th annual Weblog Awards Competition. Voting began Jan. 6 for the top blogs in 48 categories. It is the brainchild of Kevin Aylward who founded the Wizbang blogs. Weblog Awards is the world’s largest blog competition with over 950,000 votes cast as of last Thursday. Winners will be announced Tuesday, Jan. 13th. Which ones got my vote? I’ll never tell, but here are a few that caught my eye:

CakeWrecks, utterly unbelievable confections that live up to the name.

Small Dead Animals, the Roadkill Diaries.

Snapped Shot. Check out his “Want peace?” posters.

My Mom is a Fob, a hilarious look at life with an Asian mother, written by two sisters. Side splitting. Really.

Top Political Blogs

Personal Democracy Forum is releasing its list of 2009′s Top Political Blogs. Ranked by authority on Technorati, some blogsites are ideological, others are journalistic. PDF editors broke out the top 20 lists of liberal and conservative blogs and reported, “Today, for almost no money, anyone can be a reporter, a community organizer, an ad-maker, a publisher, a money-raiser, or a leader. If what they have to say is compelling, it will spread. The cost of finding like-minded souls, banding together, and speaking to the powerful has dropped to almost zero. Networked voices are reviving the civic conversation.”

Blogger Enlightened Redneck observes, “The free-wheeling, independent blogosphere of yore is no more.”

Straight news from the Middle East

In what is a welcome alternative to the biased reporting in the mainstream media, Pajamas Media TV has launched Gaza Update, a daily report from the U.S. and Israel on the conflict, Israeli politics, the impact on Israelis, and on media bias. Even Joe the Plumber goes to Israel to cover the Gaza War for Pajamas TV.

“Roger L. Simon writes, “We have a live camera in Jerusalem and we are going to feature the following talent there, among others: Caroline Glick of the Jerusalem Post, our own Middle East Editor Allison Kaplan Sommer (a Tel Aviv resident), Richard Landes of Boston University and a part-time Jerusalem resident and Nitsana Leitner of the Israeli Law Center.

Not on my network!

One of the week’s biggest stories in a week filled with them was this one: the Obama commercial that the cable news operations didn’t want you to see. WorldNetDaily broke the story Jan. 8, with an inset of the ad video, which had been uploaded to YouTube.

In its first day, the minute-long ad attracted nearly 120,000 views.

“WND columnist Janet Porter told WND she found that out when her organization, Faith2Action.org, tried to purchase airtime to publicize information about the eligibility concerns.”

“She told WND that national networks that refused to sell her time for a 60-second commercial included CNBC, MSNBC, Headline News, CNN and Fox. Washington, D.C., outlets for the same organizations did the same.”

Not another Post-It note

Need a reminder? Try this: remindr.info.

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