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Peter Boyles of Denver’s KHOW Radio

A top-rated talk radio host in Denver, Colo., has received some good news about his hopes to erect “Where’s the Birth Certificate?” billboards in front of hundreds of thousands of drivers a day when a local businessman heard his radio show and agreed to donate the sign space.

Now, WND has learned, that businessman is planning on donating signage in multiple states to get the message out that Barack Obama has yet to prove his constitutional eligibility to serve as president.

As WND reported, Peter Boyles, who hosts the top-rated morning program on Denver’s KHOW-AM, has been fascinated with the president’s refusal to
release his long-form, hospital-generated birth certificate to verify
his qualification to serve as commander in chief and has dedicated many
hours of his program in recent weeks to discussion of all sides of the
eligibility issue, much of which has been based on WorldNetDaily’s extensive coverage.

Demand the truth by joining the petition campaign to make President Obama reveal his long-form, hospital-generated birth certificate!

Earlier this week, Boyles announced he would seek approval to post billboards in the Denver area questioning Obama’s proof of eligibility.

Friday morning, Boyles celebrated that one of the hurdles in his plan has been cleared: used car lot owner Phil Wolf has agreed to donate the space on his business’ two, massive signs fronting Interstate Highway 70, a location estimated to be seen by over 300,000 drivers per day.

“It’s a very cool moment,” Boyles said on the air. “It’ll rock ‘n’ roll when this happens. … Maybe other radio talk-show hosts will do the same and see what their audiences do.”

And in an exclusive interview, Wolf – who owns dealerships in two other Rocky Mountain states – told WND that he doesn’t plan on stopping with Denver.

“I have car dealerships in Montana and Wyoming also,” Wolf said, “and I plan on putting up the signs everywhere.”

Wolf told WND he had been reading about and talking to others about Obama’s eligibility, wondering how he might use the two large signs at Wolf Interstate Leasing & Sales in Wheat Ridge, a western suburb of Denver, to make a difference.

“We were talking about using our signs to become politically proactive, and I heard Peter Boyles on the radio. It just made sense,” Wolf said. “One thing led to another and I got a hold of Pete.

“I told Peter I’d be willing to donate my signs for the message,” he said. “I think [Obama's eligibility] is an important enough issue to get past what we do daily to look to the bigger picture.”

WND has reported on the multitude of lawsuits and other challenges to Barack Obama’s eligibility to be president based on the U.S. Constitution’s demand that the president be a “natural born citizen.”

And Obama’s birth certificate is not the only document at issue. WND has reported that among the documentation not yet available for Obama includes kindergarten records, Punahou school records, Occidental College records, Columbia University records, Columbia thesis, Harvard Law School records, Harvard Law Review articles, scholarly articles from the University of Chicago, his passport, medical records, files from his years as an Illinois state senator, Illinois State Bar Association records, any baptism records, and his adoption records.

WND previously reported on a variety of “Where’s the Birth Certificate” signs that have sprouted around the country.

They arrived just as the latest WND-sponsored billboard went up in front of Las Vegas’ Mandalay Bay Hotel.


The newest “Where’s The Birth Certificate” billboard – in Las Vegas

Fans of the campaign kicked off originally by Joseph Farah, editor and chief executive officer of WND, placed their own sign in Quilcene, Wash., on Center Road, a state highway that connects 101 and 104, leading to the Hood Canal Bridge.

“Lots of tourists pass by this sign all summer long,” said the folks responsible. “We are proud of our contribution, however humble.”

Another effort, by an unknown supporter, appears on Kenwood Drive in Spring Valley, Calif., in San Diego County.

The fence on which this sign hangs faces a large Presbyterian church, so all members see the banner upon exiting on Sunday morning, notes the photographer.

Others were found in Chehalis, Wash., and Linden, Texas.

One reader in Louisville, Ky., even created his own sign and mounted it on his truck to send a “mobile” message.

“I get great satisfaction out of doing my small part to keep this most important question out there in the daily thoughts of the man on the street,” the truck owner told WND. “I also make it a point to drive by the new regional FBI headquarters building just to let them know the question will not go away until the eligibility question has been satisfied.”

How does all this sit with the originator of the campaign? Farah says he’s pleased and considers imitation, in this case, a positive development.

“We may never be able to place billboards in every state in the country and certainly not every community,” he said. “I encourage those with the means to take matters into their own hands to do so.”

For those less ambitious, Farah also devised a way for everyone to get into the act – with your own car or your own yard.

There are magnetized bumper stickers with the now-famous message and design – “Where’s the birth certificate?”

And there are yard and rally signs you can either take to your next tea party or turn your own property into a mini-billboard location.

WND previously launched a petition campaign that has collected nearly half a million names demanding Obama’s eligibility be verified and demonstrated publicly. That campaign continues. That list has been shared with members of the Electoral College and the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

You can support the billboard campaign right now by making a donation online.

Those wishing to donate by check can send them to:

WND
P.O. Box 1627
Medford, OR 97501

(Donations are not tax-deductible. Donations of amounts greater than $1,000 can be arranged by calling either 541-474-1776 or 1-800-4WND.COM.

If you are a member of the media and would like to interview Joseph Farah about this campaign, e-mail WND.

 



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