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Citizens on government health care say 'no more'

Citizens who know government-run health care the best – the recipients of Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE and other programs – say they oppose Washington’s proposed expansion and think it will do more harm than good.

That comes from the newest Zogby International/O’Leary Report poll of 4,426 likely voters Sept. 4-8.

A subset of 842 voters found to be receiving government health care from a number of programs were asked a series of questions about the proposals offered by Washington.

According to the poll, a majority of American voters who currently are covered by a government health insurance program oppose more government intrusion into the health-care industry.

O’Leary, besides authoring the report bearing his name, also has written “Shut Up America: The End of Free Speech.”

The first poll question was: “Would you support or oppose having a government health insurance plan compete with private health insurance plans?”

More than 50 percent said they opposed a government-run option, about 41 percent said they support it and the rest were uncertain.

“Who better to ask about government-run health care than those who currently rely on the government for their health care?” asked Brad O’Leary, publisher of “The O’Leary Report.”

“Those Americans who have the most experience with government-run health care programs are clearly opposed to expanding government’s role in the health care business,” he said.

More than 54 percent of the respondents opposed the idea of a “single-payer” system in which the federal government pays for health care. Thirty-nine percent supported the idea.

Given a choice between a statement that the government is needed to control costs or the government’s role in health care will do more harm than good, 49 percent chose the second statement. Thirty-eight percent chose the first.

A fourth question was: “Would you support or oppose a provision that banned the government or insurance companies from considering a patient’s age or life-expectancy when deciding whether or not to cover certain medical procedures?”

Fifty-five percent supported the statement while 38 percent were opposed.

The respondents also expressed a desire to pinpoint corrections in the present system where problems are discovered.

Question No. 5 was, “It is estimated that 10 million Americans, 3.3 percent of the U.S. population, are too poor to afford health insurance, yet their income levels are high enough to disqualify them from government-provided health care programs like Medicaid. Should health care reform focus on providing coverage for this 3.3 percent of Americans, or should congress overhaul the entire U.S. health care system.”

More than 45 percent said address the 3.3 percent who have difficulties, while 36 percent suggested a systemwide overhaul.

More than two of three opposed the idea of the government requiring everyone to buy health insurance or face a fine. Only 18 percent supported the idea.

Other questions were:

O’Leary said citizens who want to contact Congress about the issue can do so at HealthCareVote.com.

If you are a member of the media and would like to interview Brad O’Leary about this story, e-mail press@wnd.com.