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As a native-born American citizen, let me tell you about last week.

I schedule chores to get them done within one day.

So off I went, list in hand, for routine stops.

First, to the library to return a book and pay the 25-cent fine.

I was asked for my ID – i.e. my California driver’s license – before I could complete the transaction.

Ooh – show me your papers.

Then, to the bank where I’ve done business for 25 years! I wanted to make several deposits and cash a $200 check to have some cash on hand.

The teller handling the transactions has known me for all those years.

I was asked to show my driver’s license, which was swiped, before completing my transactions.

Ooh – show me your papers.

Then, I went to a local merchant, where I’ve shopped regularly for the more than 10 years they’ve been open in my town and where I’ve spent thousands of dollars.

I used my usual credit card for payment, but the clerk wouldn’t complete the transaction without also seeing my driver’s license.

Ooh – show me your papers.

Then, I purchased a plane ticket for a domestic flight, something I’ve been doing for years. There’s something new. Not only does the airline want your name and credit card for payment, they also want your date of birth and – ta-dah! – your driver’s license.

Ooh – show me your papers.

Check in for seat assignment? Same thing.

Before you go through security? Same thing.

It’s become routine with that really important little piece of plastic with my picture on it.

I never could have imagined years ago when I got my first license that the little ID would be so vital to my existence as an American citizen.

When I got my job doing the radio program on KSFO in San Francisco, I had to provide my passport to properly identify myself before they could complete our agreement – and this was despite the fact that I’d worked for the same company before and had known them for years!

No choice. Want the job? Show your passport.

Ooh – show me your papers.

I’m sorry. Am I supposed to feel empathy for those thousands of – as we are told repeatedly – “brown-skinned people” who don’t like being asked about their immigration status?

Ooh – they don’t like being asked to show their papers.

Of course, the real problem is that they don’t have papers! They’re called “undocumented” for a reason.

I’m tired of their complaints. The only thing I feel for them is scorn. If they don’t like following the laws of this country, they shouldn’t be here – and the color of their skin does not matter.

If they’re here illegally, they’ll just have to live with the discomfort of living outside the law.

We’re constantly told how these people “live in the shadows,” as though it’s our fault and our responsibility to get them into the sunshine.

It’s not my fault they sneaked into the country and not my responsibility to get them legalized.

I do not feel sorry for them, and I owe them nothing. Life is tough; get used to it.

The legal framework exists to apply for citizenship and complete what’s required, just as millions have done in our history.

There have always been people who jumped ship to be here illegally, but never in our history has our own federal government allowed – no, actually encouraged – mass illegal entry into the country.

It raises serious questions about the motivation of the elected officials who deliberately choose to ignore the laws and encourage the lawbreaking.

American citizens have to put up with intrusions into their privacy at every turn, and it’s getting worse. It’s partly because of Islamic terrorism and partly because millions of lawbreakers swarm across our porous borders, disrupting our economy and culture.

All the commotion over Arizona’s new law – which simply reaffirms the rights of police to enforce federal law – is both incredibly naïve and intentionally divisive.

It’s clear those people complaining, demonstrating, rioting, boycotting and threatening to sue have one basic motive: undermine the laws of this country to weaken our sovereignty.

Logic and the rule of law don’t apply because these people don’t care.

I loved the news in San Francisco last week, after the supervisors called for a city boycott of Arizona asking to end all business dealings.

But then – oops! – they had to rethink that, because it could cost the city lots of money to find other sources for needed services.

A local columnist, Jon Carroll, waxing liberal about Mexican immigrants, legal or not, extended a blanket invitation: “Hey, you skilled Mexican workers and chefs residing in Arizona, come on over to the Bay Area. Housing has never been cheaper!”

I guess that was his cute joke about home foreclosures, but he went on saying he tends “to like immigration laws that are not enforced.”

He says it keeps “everybody on their toes and yet the per capita damage rate is very small.”

Perhaps he hasn’t checked on the dollar cost to area cities in terms of crime, the judicial system, education, burdens on the medical system and welfare programs as a result of the illegals he welcomes.

Considering that most cities and the state are almost bankrupt, welcoming illegals is the height of foolishness and liberal blindness.

It’s typical of Californians though – eager to spend into bankruptcy, but they feel so good about themselves!

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