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Friends sometimes find themselves on opposite sides during political campaigns, when emotions can ride high.

Fortunately, just as opponents usually shake hands afterward, so do those friends.


But the rift that developed during the 2010 election cycle between Democrats for Life and basically the rest of the pro-life movement is irreparable, at least as long as Kristen Day remains its executive director.


Day became incensed when pro-life groups fulfilled their promise to target House pro-life Democrats for electoral defeat who voted for Obamacare sans the Stupak Amendment.

Pro-life groups considered those Democrats traitors, caving at the last moment to usher in taxpayer funding of abortion. These included Americans United for Life, Concerned Women for America, Eagle Forum, Family Research Council, the National Right to Life Committee, Priests for Life, the Southern Baptist Convention, the Susan B. Anthony List and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

In fact, Kristen Day wholeheartedly opposed Obamacare if it excluded the Stupak Amendment in the months leading up to the March 21, 2010, cave-in of pro-life Democrats.

As recently as March 14, a week before Obamacare passed, Day forwarded to her e-mail list an Associated Press article entitled, “Dem House vote-counter lacks health care votes now,” with the comment, “It is going to be a long week.  Let’s hope we can keep Clyburn from the votes he needs.”

But Day underwent an astounding change of opinion following Obamacare’s passage, surely in large part due to her belief that President Obama’s executive order closed any and all abortion loopholes in the bill (which it did not – read NRLC’s thorough analysis).

Incredibly, the Democrats for Life website now hails Obamacare as “the most pro-life legislation of the last two years.”

Day began publicly bashing other pro-life groups, convinced their motive was not as stated but rather to function as covert operatives for the Republican Party. From Politics Daily, Nov. 3:

“They [pro-life groups] put all their eggs in one party,” said Kristen Day, executive director for Democrats for Life. … “They don’t want two pro-life parties because most of them want a Republican majority.”

The Nation, Oct. 28:

Says … Kristen Day: “I just wish they’d [SBA List] change their mission statement, to say they are trying to elect Republicans and trying to defeat pro-life Democrats.”

The Daily Caller, Nov. 6:

Kristen Day said … “We’ll see what the conservative groups want to do in the future, but right now it seems groups like the Susan B. Anthony List want to remove the pro-life voice from the Democratic Party.”

The Catholic News Agency, Nov. 5:

Day charged that conservative pro-lifers have been trying to cut down pro-life Democrats “for some time” because “they feel like the abortion issue is a winning issue for the Republicans and they don’t want the Democrats to take that away.”

I suppose all the aforementioned would be forgivable after political passions died down, but then Day went too far.

When Steve Driehaus, one of the embattled pro-life Democrats from Ohio, filed a complaint with the Ohio Elections Commission, claiming this billboard SBA List planned to erect contained false information …

… Day submitted two affidavits on his behalf.

In the latter affidavit, Day relayed a statement she said NRLC’s Doug Johnson made during a private off-the-record meeting of pro-life groups (which he denies). She also relayed the details of an e-mail exchange she had with Susan B. Anthony List President Marjorie Dannenfelser.

Day relished Driehaus’ attempt to retrieve through the discovery process any documents, e-mails, or records that would link the SBA List to the Republican Party, writing in a Oct. 25 press release:

All records, including any coordinated communication with the Republican National Committee, will have to be turned over to lawyers for Congressman Steve Dreihaus [sic].

“This is an historic first step to stop the mudslinging and lies that have come to dominate American politics,” said Kristen Day. …

“Susan B. Anthony List together with other Republican dominated pro-life organizations, have adopted Rovian tactics to unfairly attack pro-life Democrats in furtherance of their true mission of electing a Republican Congress,” said Day. “Pretending to be bipartisan while lying to defeat pro-life Democrats is simply not a good strategy to advance the pro-life movement in America.”

Earlier this week, Driehaus decided to drop his complaint. The Ohio Elections Commission will rule Dec. 2 whether to accept his request.

But the issue of Kristen Day’s betrayal of pro-life groups and confidences – erroneous or true – remains on the table and is insurmountable.

The next time Day becomes angry her affidavit may contain my name. It may contain my internal communications with her. It may contain her version of an off-the-record conversation she and I had. Maybe the next subpoena will be addressed to me.

The liberal activist Democrat lawyers who represented Driehaus in his complaint would have liked nothing better than to use his case to get to the internal communications of other national pro-life organizations.

Day has publicly anticipated the prospect of these being made public, which is to say, given over to our political opponents and to the mainstream media.

In fact, Kristen Day is an active agent of these efforts.

As one veteran insider told me, “I do not believe Kristen Day is a paid agent for Planned Parenthood posing as a pro-life activist.  But if such an agent ever did exist, she could hardly be more unworthy of trust or more destructive than Day has shown herself to be.”

For these reasons, Kristen Day should never again be allowed to attend any internal pro-life meeting. Prudence would also dictate that pro-lifers think carefully before communicating with her. Democrats for Life should be banned from inclusion in the pro-life circle until Day is gone and the group demonstrates it is worthy of trust again.

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