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They believe they're gods

Posted By Erik Rush On 01/27/2011 @ 1:00 am In Commentary | Comments Disabled

Over the last week, I’ve had conversations with colleagues which touched on the concept that the entire left-right paradigm of the political parties in America is fallacious, à la professor Carroll Quigley (1910-77). In the “real” model (according to those who argue so), neither of the two preeminent parties in America actually represent divergent ideals and policies, but only appear to. Those ignorant – but extremely useful – ideologues and voters who “fight the good fight” only serve to distract and to empower a cadre of global elites. These power players, like progressives, are essentially societal parasites, rather than visionaries or workers who produce wealth. They actually transcend, if you will, the political system in which most of us operate.

Let us presume for a moment that this is precisely the case. It would infer then, that the threat of progressive-Marxist collectivism against which so many of us preach is simply a “smoke soldier,” having no real power to implement those odious things people such as myself claim are around the bend. The same could be said about Islamofascism then, since that doctrine would obliterate the power – and the wealth – of such forces.

I believe the truth is somewhere in between. Over the last decade in particular, many have recognized that there is scant difference between how the Republican and Democratic Parties operate, and this assertion certainly has some merit. If we are to take even a few people at their word, then we must presume that there are still some constitutional conservatives in our government. If that is true, then of course those who are attempting to reinstitute constitutional principles in government are on the right track. This would include members of the tea-party movement, who are operating through the GOP, for example.

Also true – in the “false left-right paradigm” – would be the threat perceived regarding the advent of such grassroots movements on the part of those power players operating through both political parties. Now, despite the supposed anonymity of these people, we do know who they are, because they have never really operated with the degree of secrecy claimed by some Americans.

Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws.

– Mayer Amschel Rothschild, international banker

One we know to be Hungarian financier George Soros, who operates quite out in the open. Controlling money is what Soros is about. He has made billions manipulating currencies and creating untold suffering among “little people” all over the globe. His imperious and cavalier rhetoric concerning the restructuring of America and the decline of its currency have been nothing short of monumentally audacious, as well as manifestly seditious.

Does this mean that our situation is hopeless, that the system is hopelessly corrupt, and that all of our heroes – from grassroots citizens, to lawmakers and statesmen who remain faithful to the Constitution – are essentially micturating into the wind?

I think not.


Since I entered politics, I have chiefly had men’s views confided to me privately. Some of the biggest men in the United States, in the field of commerce and manufacture, are afraid of somebody, are afraid of something. They know that there is a power so organized, so subtle, so watchful, so interlocked, so complete, so persuasive that prudent men had better not speak above their breath when they speak in condemnation of it.

– Woodrow Wilson, “The New Freedom”

This quote, familiar to many politically engaged Internet prowlers, is often used to validate the existence of a New World Order, the schema wherein international bankers and old-money dynasties essentially control – well, everything – and that all Western nations’ systems of governance are but a sham.

It has been argued, however, that Wilson was referring to us, the American people. In the context of the passage, this may not seem so, however, it appears equally unlikely that this early progressive, elitist president would attempt to warn the American people against those dark forces marshaled to enslave them, the reason being that American presidents are generally well aware of the goings-on vis-à-vis globalist power players – if they are not in fact consciously working at their behest.

I submit that, although these dark lords do indeed exist and are certainly influential in sociopolitical developments worldwide, they do not possess the degree of authority that conspiracy theorists believe they have, nor the authority they believe they have.

They’ve made the mistake of believing that they are gods – and they’re wrong. There is but one God, and I believe that those who are working toward the preservation of this nation as a constitutional republic are doing His work.

This is why I believe that so much effort is being put into demonizing grassroots movements in America, members of the tea party in particular. The elites I have elucidated upon here know that should Americans succeed in gaining real control of any political party (whether the existing ones, or others in the offing), their time as puppet masters in America will be short.


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