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Editor’s Note: The following report is excerpted from Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert, the premium online newsletter published by the current No. 1 best-selling author, WND staff writer and senior managing director of the Financial Services Group at Gilford Securities.

The 2010 Census reveals that Hispanics now outnumber blacks for the first time in U.S. metropolitan areas, Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert reports.

Hispanics are now the largest minority group in 191 metropolitan areas, up from 159 metro areas as recorded in the 2000 Census.

Moreover, the recent Census data shows the Hispanic population has spread out from the Southwest, to include cities throughout the United States.

The Hispanic population grew 42 percent in the last decade, totaling now 50.1 million, or about one in every six Americans.

The Census Bureau makes the following predictions/observations about the growth of the Hispanic population in the United States:

  • By 2050, the Hispanic population in the United States will approximately double to 102.6 million people;
  • Between 2000 and 2006, Hispanics accounted for one-half of the nation’s growth;
  • Between 2000 and 2006, the Hispanic growth rate (24.3 percent) was more than three times the growth rate of the total population (6.1 percent);
  • The majority of Hispanic immigration to the United States in the years 2000 – 2006 was from Mexico, 64 percent.

One reason President Obama has resisted any and all measures to secure the U.S. border with Mexico is the Democratic Party’s expectation that the surge in Hispanic population will represent an electoral advantage for Democratic candidates seeking public office.

The Wall Street Journal reported in an April 11 article authored by Patrick O’Connor that the explosive growth of the Hispanic population reflected in the 2010 Census “will remake the electoral map – and could present Republicans with a challenge.”

The article argued that Republicans will have to win over Hispanics, given that Hispanics account for 65 percent of the population growth in Texas over the past decade, 55 percent of the growth in Florida and nearly half the population increase in Arizona and Nevada.

“Hispanics have historically voted in lower proportions than blacks and whites,” O’Connor wrote. “In 2008, they voted for President Barack Obama by nearly 2-to-1.”

For more information on the Hispanic population explosion in the U.S., read Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert, the premium, online intelligence news source by the WND staff writer, columnist and author of the New York Times No. 1 best-seller, “The Obama Nation.

Red Alert’s author, who received a doctorate from Harvard in political science in 1972, is the author of the No. 1 New York Times best-sellers “The Obama Nation” and (with co-author John E. O’Neill) “Unfit for Command.” He is also the author of several other books, including “America for Sale,” “The Late Great U.S.A.” and “Why Israel Can’t Wait.” In addition to serving as a senior staff reporter for WorldNetDaily, Corsi is a senior managing director in the financial-services group at Gilford Securities.

Disclosure: Gilford Securities, founded in 1979, is a full-service boutique investment firm headquartered in New York City providing an array of financial services to institutional and retail clients, from investment banking and equity research to retirement planning and wealth-management services. The views, opinions, positions or strategies expressed by the author are his alone and do not necessarily reflect Gilford Securities Incorporated’s views, opinions, positions or strategies. Gilford Securities Incorporated makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability or validity of any information expressed herein and will not be liable for any errors, omissions or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

For full immediate access to Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert, get your free subscription now.

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