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McClintock: Obama passed eligibility requirements

A California Republican congressman says voters, Congress and the courts all have cleared Barack Obama’s eligibility to be president.

The comments come from U.S. Rep. Tom McClintock, whose e-mail to a constituent with a question about the eligibility issue was forwarded to WND.

He said, “The Constitution is the starting point for determining eligibility to serve as president. The Constitution requires that to be eligible to serve as president an individual must be a natural born citizen of the United States, be at least 35 years old, and have been a permanent resident in the United States for at least 14 years.”

Get the New York Times best-seller “Where’s the Birth Certificate? The Case that Barack Obama Is Not Eligible to be President,” autographed by Jerome Corsi, Ph.D.

McClintock continued, “Currently, a candidate’s eligibility under these requirements is vetted by a number of sources, both inside the government and out. First, candidates go through an intensive political vetting process in both the primary and general election – their histories are carefully examined by their political opponents who have a vested interest in uncovering the facts. At the end of the campaigns, the voting public weighs in. Then, when all the votes have been cast and counted, it is up to Congress to certify the results. A final check-and-balance against eligibility irregularities lies with the courts, and ultimately the Supreme Court.”

He said Obama has passed each of those standards.

“Further, in President Obama’s case – in addition to his Hawaii birth certificate – there were two birth announcements in major Hawaii newspapers, the Honolulu Advertiser and the Star Bulletin,” he said.

The comment suggests the perspective that being born on U.S. soil would be sufficient for “natural born citizenship,” even though there are experts who define “natural born citizen” as the offspring of two citizen parents on the country’s soil, which would be an issue for Obama as his father never was a U.S. citizen.

WND previously reported how Jerry W. Mansfield, an information research specialist in the Knowledge Services Group of the Congressional Research Service, issued a memo to prepare members of Congress to rebut and defuse questions constituents were asking regarding Obama’s presidential eligibility under the natural-born citizen requirement of the Constitution.

WND has posted the CRS memo on Scribd.com for download.

Attached to the memo was an attack-piece published by FactCheck.org to dismiss claims that Obama’s short-form Certification of Live Birth, originally published during the 2008 presidential campaign by DailyKos.com, was a forgery.

Many of the statements from members of Congress also appear to make assumptions about Obama, such as the validity of the “Certificate of Live Birth” that was released by the White House, even though a multitude of experts have concluded that it is a fake.

When Obama released that image on April 27, after years of stating that the document was not available, the Hawaii Department of Health and governor’s office refused even to confirm for WND that the image released was an accurate representation of the state’s records.

And the questions about Obama’s status continue to grow. A recent poll showed fully half the nation wants Congress to investigate his eligibility.

Instead of resolving issues, the image that Obama released to the public on April 27 has raised new ones. For example, during an interview by NBC News’ national investigative correspondent Michael Isikoff, former Hawaii health department chief Chiyome Fukino, who has claimed to have examined the “original” documentation in the state archives, said the original document was “half typed and half handwritten.”

But the statement conflicts with the document that Obama released on April 27 from the White House, which his staff members described as “proof positive” of a Hawaiian birth. Only the signatures and dates are “hand-written,” not half the document.

An extensive report from Mara Zebest, who has contributed as author or editor to dozens of books on computer software, concluded the image clearly is a fraud.

Among the statements from members of Congress:

Expressing doubt: