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At a large pro-life dinner in Kansas City last Tuesday, radio pundit Laura Ingraham’s impassioned speech got most of the attention, but it was the seemingly casual remarks of Kansas Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer that may have the most lasting impact.

In accepting an award on behalf of pro-life Gov. Sam Brownback for reversing the state’s life culture since his election in 2010, Colyer conceded, “For years we were the abortion capital of the United States for late-term abortions.”

This was the first time a state official at this level acknowledged in so public a setting the unspoken holocaust of the unborn, one largely orchestrated by the late Dr. George Tiller in full indifference to the state’s tough abortion laws.

Colyer, however, did not go far enough. He failed to cite the heroic efforts of the one state official who dared to fight the RINO-Dem-abortion industry complex, former Kansas Attorney General Phill Kline.

Two days later, the state Board for Discipline of Attorneys rewarded Kline for his efforts by indefinitely suspending him from practicing law in Kansas because of what it called his “dishonest and selfish” pursuit of the state’s abortion industry.

This ruling followed years of investigation by a state Supreme Court, most of whose judges were appointed by the then-governor, and now HHS Secretary Democrat, Kathleen Sebelius.

The board’s ruling followed two separate week-long hearings that, to the uninitiated, appeared to vindicate Kline.

From the outset, Kline knew better.

“The panel did what they were instructed to do,” he said. “The Sebelius court joined Planned Parenthood to file this complaint, appointed the prosecutor, appointed the panel and made the final decision.”

The hearings were presided over by a three-member panel. The local media praised the impartial nature of the panel’s make-up. They did not look too closely.

Panelist Jeff Chubb, for instance, is indeed a Republican, at least nominally. In 2008, however, Chubb sent a letter to Newsweek arguing, “The right-wing conservative ‘bashers’ have bashed so much that traditional Republicans such as myself are numb.”

Chubb’s law partner in Independence, Kan., Tim Emert was also a “traditional Republican.” In fact, his name has appeared on the letterhead of a group called the “Kansas Traditional Republican Majority,” or KTRM.

The KTRM officially promotes “inclusive government, where compassion and civility are revered, where the Republican Party serves as a place for diverse, not divisive, thoughts and opinions.”

For KTRM, nothing was as divisive as Kline’s investigation of the state’s powerful and transparently corrupt abortion industry.

ActBlue, a Democrat action group, agreed: “Phill Kline is the poster child of an entire political era defined by Republicans using state government to further divisive social issues.”

KTRM found Kline so divisive and so uncivil that in 2008 its executive director sent out a press release titled, “Kline and (Rep. Jim) Ryun Unmasked: Linked to Ku Klux Klan.”

Thanks to Republicans like KTRM, the Sebelius-headed Democratic machine, Tiller-sponsored PACs and cut-outs, and the McClatchy-owned newspapers in Kansas City and Wichita, the RINO-Dem-abortion industry complex defined the abortion narrative for years.

In their view, Kline was an obsessive snoop, a “theocrat” in the measured words of the Kansas City Star, “an anti-choice extremist” in the words of national Planned Parenthood, which gave the Star its top editorial honor for its work in helping defeat Kline’s re-election bid as attorney general.

That narrative has begun to unravel. The Kansas Board of Healing Arts inquiry last month into the medical procedures of Tiller associate, Dr. Ann Kristin Neuhaus, showed for those who cared to look how justified Kline had been in pursuing Tiller.

The case files examined during the hearing confirmed that none of the girls in question were in any kind of “substantial or irreversible danger,” as mandated by Kansas law.

As I reported, one confused little cowgirl stated as her reason for needing an abortion, “Horses are my life, and having kids would mess that up for barrel racing.” Neuhaus diagnosed her case as “major depression, single episode.”

As Kline suspected, and as the case files confirm, Tiller had taken the lives of thousands of healthy, fully viable unborn babies in total disregard for Kansas laws.

This is not only new information to have surfaced. In the course of the Kline ethics hearing, the panel learned that Tiller and Planned Parenthood both ignored the laws for reporting child molestation.

During a period when 166 abortions on children 14 and under were performed in Kansas, Planned Parenthood and Tiller’s clinic each reported just one case of child rape, and these cases were already in the media. The rest went unreported.

When Kline attempted to investigate these cases, the relevant state agencies under Sebelius did everything they could to thwart him.

The media have chosen to look elsewhere for scandal. For instance, after weeks of Pearl Harbor-size headlines about a single child pornography case mishandled by the local Catholic diocese, the Kansas City Star asked in fake sympathy, “How will KC Catholics heal?”

The deeper question, fully ignored by the Star, is, “How will Kansas heal?” To begin, Gov. Brownback has to address the Tiller legacy publicly and offer an official state apology to Phill Kline.

Then Brownback should appoint a South Africa-style Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Too much evil has gone unaddressed for far too long.

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