• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

Editor’s note: Listen to this column online.

Jan. 1, 2012, is the first day of the last year of the first term of the most “transformative” president in the history of the United States. Before he became president, Barack Hussein Obama told America that “… we are five days away from fundamentally transforming America.” During the first three years of his presidency, he has pushed his philosophy of governance further and further away from the philosophy of governance developed by the framers and enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. The defining moment in the future of the United States will come on Nov. 6, 2012, when each citizen casts – or fails to cast – a vote for the next president, and for the legislators who will guide the nation.

Before his first election, Obama promised “hope and change.” We have seen whatever “hope” his supporters voted for turn into fundamental changes in the size, cost, scope and function of the national government. Never in the history of the nation has a president or Congress even considered giving the government the power to force private citizens to purchase a specified product. President Obama and his Democratic majority in both houses of Congress transformed the function of the national government. If government is endowed with the power to force private citizens to purchase a specified health insurance product, this same power can to force private citizens to purchase a Chevrolet, solar-generated electricity, or any other product the government thinks the people should use.

This fundamental transformation of the function of government abolished the possibility, and even the dream, of America, “the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

On Dec. 6, 2011, President Obama traveled to Kansas to deliver a speech that fully outlines the direction and the extent of the transformation he fully intends to pursue. His masterful presentation carefully distorts the truth to deceive his audience into believing that his goal is the same as the goal declared by Teddy Roosevelt who said: “Our country means nothing unless it means the triumph of a real democracy … of an economic system under which each man shall be guaranteed the opportunity to show the best that there is in him.”

Obama said: “The free market is the greatest force for economic progress in human history. It’s led to a prosperity and a standard of living unmatched by the rest of the world.”

In a free market, competition sets prices, pushes innovation and encourages quality because people are free to purchase whatever product and service they wish from whomever they wish. If some businesses’ prices are too high, their products out of date or inferior, people are free to refuse to purchase products, and a free market will force these businesses to improve – or close.

The free market is “… an economic system under which each man shall be guaranteed the opportunity to show the best that there is in him.”

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.