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As a six-time undefeated middleweight world karate champion, I have a pretty good idea what makes a warrior. And there’s presently one particular presidential candidate in the political ring who wears those gloves better than the others. Even when he’s knocked down, he has astounding agility and rebound.

It’s one thing to enter a ring with a single opponent, but what if you had to enter with three: one candidate with unlimited reservoirs of wealth and two titans of political swing to back him? That is exactly what former Speaker Newt Gingrich is facing right now.

People see Newt’s primary opponent as Gov. Mitt Romney, but I don’t. I think Newt’s first adversary is Mitt and his cronies’ staggering wealth.

Last week, the Washington Post exposed that there are 41 mega-rich individuals who bankroll Romney’s campaign and his purchase of the seat in the Oval Office: “a dozen of the donors have contributed $1 million or more … including executives at Bain Capital, his former firm; bankers at Goldman Sachs; and a hedge fund mogul who made billions betting on the housing crash.”

Collectively, in Florida for example, they spent $15.4 million to run about 13,000 negative ads against Newt (not Obama). Compare that to the 200 ads Gingrich’s campaign ran. Romney’s campaign spent more on ads in Florida alone than John McCain spent during his entire presidential run. With that monstrous media assault, I was actually pleasantly surprised Newt received more than 500,000 votes compared to Romney’s 700,000.

How do you think Romney would have fared or the Florida story ended if Newt had spent $17 million on 13,000 anti-Romney ads? I think Mitt would have been toast long ago if he entered the presidential ring with similar funding.

Of course, Mitt’s money isn’t Newt’s only opponent in this election war. And I’m not talking about great patriots like Ron Paul and Rick Santorum, despite the latter’s unleashing of new anti-Newt ads in hope of stealing the anti-Mitt candidate seat. Indeed, I still think they should quit beating on one another and team up to fight President Obama.

Newt’s second major opponent is the mainstream media, or MSM. All it takes is a quick flip anytime through the major network channels to hear the pro-Romney accolades and defenses being offered via news anchors.

For example, after Newt spanked (with great audience fanfare) CNN’s John King at the South Carolina presidential debate for asking Newt to defend himself against his ex-wife’s accusations on ABC, CNN sent in its veteran bulldog, Wolf Blitzer, to host the Florida debate.

The next day, after his full court press against Newt before a national audience, I saw Wolf on CNN gloating over his victory of Newt. Wolf said, “I was ready for him. … I wasn’t going to let Newt get away with that again.” “That” being Newt’s ability to shut down the power grid of the MSM. So much for unbiased hosting and objective media! (Personally, I feel the entire future debate system should be derailed from the media’s control and played out exclusively on C-SPAN with questions being fed entirely via the Internet from citizens around the country.)

And it’s no coincidence that radically left progressive globalist and billionaire George Soros pulls the strings and wields his financial storehouses in more than 30 major puppet networks, including the New York Times, the Associated Press, Washington Post, NBC and ABC. It’s also no coincidence that Soros equally likes Romney as much as he does Obama; in his own words during a taped television interview, he said, “between Obama and Romney, there isn’t all that much difference.”

The MSM would have us believe that the GOP contest is over and Romney is the winner. But the battle has just begun. Newt is absolutely correct when he stated, “This race is not anywhere near over. There are 46 states to go.” Or as Joseph Farah, CEO of WND.com, one of very few sources I trust for the news, shared on Hannity last week: “Nobody has 100 delegates yet. We are not even one-tenth of the way to the end of the GOP election.”

Perhaps a word from Thomas Jefferson is apropos here about the power of the MSM: “The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.”

The third enemy of Newt is the entrenched GOP establishment – a part of what Newt calls the Washington elite. They loathe Newt not because of what he’s done, but because he is a lethal threat to their way of life and existence, namely their political sway and control over your money or tax dollars.

When the GOP establishment saw Newt’s colossal win in the South Carolina primary, they scurried to bring forth a few of their kingpins, like Bob Dole and John McCain, to try and convince us Newt was a danger to us, too. The Boston Globe even ran an article, “GOP insiders rise up to cut Gingrich down to size.”

Newt retorted at a tea-party gathering in central Florida by stating categorically, “The Republican establishment is just as much an establishment as the Democratic establishment, and they are just as determined to stop us.”

Dan Schnur, a former GOP campaign strategist who teaches politics at the University of Southern California, completely agrees: “The Republican establishment might not be wild about Mitt Romney, but they’re terrified by Newt Gingrich.”

Rush Limbaugh reacted to the frightened squirms of the GOP establishment by saying, “Newt doesn’t act like he has any fear … finally, someone is telling the bad guys who they are and that we’re not going to take it anymore … just like Reagan did … Newt has thrown them into a tizzy.”

While Romney decries that he is not a Washington insider, it is amazing to me that he gloats over the roughly 72 Washington elite who endorse him compared with Newt’s 11. Rather than a badge of honor, that’s a thorn of shame. What do they say? Birds of a feather flock together. I have only to remind my readership of the tea-party’s initial receptivity in Washington, which was not exactly a tea party.

One last example of Washington elite running to Romney’s aid came a few weeks ago when former Speaker Nancy Pelosi attempted to derail Newt by saying she had a secret that would thwart him from becoming president (something that ended up a fabrication). But what chapped my hide about Pelosi’s tirade was her clear audacity, arrogance and vindictiveness when she vehemently retorted like the wicked witch of the west: “Mark my words: That man will not be elected!”

Who is Pelosi to circumvent the American voter when the election process has just begun by forcefully telling the public via CNN about Newt’s election, “It’s not going to happen!” Is that the type of elite power mongering you still want running Washington? She epitomizes the very problem with leadership in the U.S. Capital, and why we must send someone in there who will turn over the establishment to resurrect the principles of our founding fathers and restore our republic.

I’m reminded here of Samuel Adams’ wisdom and challenge: “If ever time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.”

If it’s true that you can always tell one’s positions by the enemies they have, and I believe it is, then Newt is exactly where he needs to be, battling the trifecta of tyranny: Mitt’s treasuries, the MSM and the GOP elite.

One cannot, in any way, underestimate the grisly enormity of this triple-headed monstrosity. It is a Goliath of ginormous proportions. And let there be no doubt: Only heaven and earth combining their forces will overcome this gargantuan foe.

As I’ve said in previous columns, we need the best of the best veterans of political war to fight against the three-headed chthonic giant, and then to scale the Washington acropolis and combat the supreme sultan of political swing occupying the Oval Office.

Thomas Paine was correct: “Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered.”

(Please, go to Newt.org and help Newt triumph over the trifecta of tyranny.)

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