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Editor’s Note: The following report is excerpted from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, the premium online newsletter published by the founder of WND. Subscriptions are $99 a year or, for monthly trials, just $9.95 per month for credit card users, and provide instant access for the complete reports.

WASHINGTON – China is considering a change in its historical policy of avoiding alliances and is looking to establish military and strategic ties with other countries in an effort to counter U.S. military influence worldwide, according to a report in Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

Chinese strategists suggested the move in a conference sponsored by China’s National Security Policy Commission, which is led by senior military officers who are virulently anti-American.

Already, recent Chinese strategic decisions have indicated a new policy already is under way.

“History of the world tells us that, whether it’s in political, economic or military arenas, Western nations, without any exception, always resorted to alliances,” said one Chinese security analyst.

“China must change its non-alliance policy,” he said. “We must consider forming alliances. Otherwise, in a future war with the U.S., we will not be able to politically or militarily counter America’s global alliance network just by ourselves.

“Without an alliance system of our own,” he said, “we will never be able to win.”

Yang Mingje of the Chinese Institute of Contemporary International Relations, China’s largest strategic think-tank run by the Ministry of State Security, said the view among Chinese strategists is that while the U.S. is looking to put more of its military forces in the Pacific, the U.S. continues to have a global agenda, since “China has become a global power.”

To fight a globalized China, he said, the U.S. also must act globally as it did during the Cold War.

Any alliance with neighbors may be questionable, since Beijing has upset many of them with claims of historical rights to disputed islands and in regions where there are disagreements over offshore drilling access.

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