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A new poll indicates that putting the Bush name on the 2012 Republican ticket as vice president would produce a winner, while the much-vaunted Rubio name would bring defeat.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has been lauded by many inside and outside the GOP as a desired candidate for vice president even though he’s stated he’s not open to running.

But now the Miami New Times has reported the results of a new McClatchy-Marist poll with the comment that former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush “could help more than Rubio.”

Rubio would have the same eligibility question that has plagued Barack Obama for his three years in the White House, because although he was born in Miami, Fla., in 1971, his parents were not U.S. citizens at the time. They did not become American citizens until Nov. 5, 1975, four years after Marco was born.

Some constitutional scholars believe a natural-born citizen, a requirement for president, is someone born to parents who are both U.S. citizens.

The New Marist poll shows that current GOP front-runner Mitt Romney, when paired with Rubio against Obama and Joe Biden, trails 44 percent to 49 percent with 8 percent undecided.

But with Romney paired with Bush, who already has endorsed the former Massachusetts governor, the Democrats and Republicans are tied 47-47 percent, with 6 percent undecided.

The Miami New Times said that “surprisingly,” Bush earned better support from Latinos than Rubio, who endorsed Romney this week.

Among Latinos, 57 percent would support a Romney-Bush ticket, while 39 percent would go for the current administration.

When the GOP ticket includes Rubio, only 46 percent of the Latinos would support that ticket, while 50 percent would go for Obama-Biden.

A Bush ticket also gets 48 percent of the independent vote, to 42 percent for Obama-Biden, while a Rubio ticket gets 43 percent of the independent vote, to 45 percent for Obama-Biden.

A Bush ticket even draws 37 percent of the moderate vote, along with 74 percent of the conservative and 72 percent of the very conservative, compared to 34 percent of the moderates who would pick a Rubio ticket. Rubio would get 69 percent of the conservative and 71 percent of the very conservative vote.

Jeb Bush also pulls 50 percent of the vote from men and 44 percent of the women, while a Rubio ticket pulls 46 percent of the men and 41 percent of the women.

The New Times said, “Of course, though Rubio has received lots of media attention, he’s been on the national scene for only about two years. Pretty much every voter in America is familiar with the last name Bush.”

The poll indicates that when the presidential candidates are taken alone, Obama edges Romney 46 percent to 44 percent, and holds a 48 percent to 43 percent margin over Santorum.

Obama also leads Ron Paul 50 percent to 40 percent and leads Newt Gingrich 53 percent to 38 percent.

“Despite the twists and turns of the GOP primary contest, little has changed in an Obama-Romney matchup,” said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion.

“Electorate is polarized and voters are mostly decided. Don’t expect dramatic swings in voter sentiments along the general election campaign trail.”

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