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Editor’s note: This is Part 2 of a multi-part series on child pornography on Facebook. You can read Part 1 here. Media wishing to interview WND’s Chelsea Schilling can contact us here.

(EXPLICIT CONTENT: This report contains graphic details of sexual abuse of children as it has appeared in numerous locations on Facebook. WND immediately reported images of child pornography and child sexual abuse to the FBI. Censored screenshots published are among the mildest of those found.)

In a dark attic, a little girl, no older than 9, appears with a distrustful look on her face as she wears only a training bra. She glimpses the camera out of the corner of her eye. The many comments under her photo are telling:

“So cute!” one man declares.

“Oh yes, that’s right,” says another.

She is only one of 40 other preteen girls on a single profile who are dressed in sexy swimsuits, bras or nothing at all.

It is just one photo among thousands of explicit images and videos of child sexual exploitation – all available on the social network 901 million users have come to know and love, Facebook. Most of America’s users have no idea that the social network is home to an enormous collection of unreported child pornography and sexual violence.

In a dark attic, a little girl, no older than 9, appears with a distrustful look on her face as she wears only a training bra.

As WND previously reported, most of these predators aren’t merely looking at child pornography images. A 2007 Federal Bureau of Prisons study in which psychologists conducted an in-depth survey of online offenders’ sexual behavior, revealed that 85 percent of convicted Internet offenders said they had committed acts of sexual abuse against minors, from inappropriate touching to rape.

The U.S. Department of Justice explains:

Unfortunately, the child pornography market exploded in the advent of the Internet and advanced digital technology. The Internet provides ground for individuals to create, access, and share child sexual abuse images worldwide at the click of a button. … Child pornography offenders can connect on Internet networks and forums to share their interests, desires, and experiences abusing children in addition to selling, sharing, and trading images.

Moreover, online communities have promoted communication between child pornography offenders, both normalizing their interest in children and desensitizing them to the physical and psychological damages inflicted on child victims. Online communities may also attract or promote new individuals to get involved in the sexual exploitation of children.

Another Facebook "like" option for pedophile profiles: "12 to 13 boy sex"

(Story continues. Read Page 2)

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